New database: The online library of pop music journalism!

RockBanner

Interested in reading up on LL Cool J or Ke$ha?

Want to listen to an audio interview with
Black Sabbath’s Tony Iommi or Ozzy Osbourne?

Curious to learn more about industrial music or Scandinavian pop?

How about an unpublished 2011 interview with the late
Chris Cornell?

Worry not: the recently added database Rock’s Backpages has that and so much more!

 

RockPick

With over 30,000 articles by music journalists collected over the last 50 years, Rock’s Backpages covers a spectrum of artists ranging from Aaliyah to ZZ Top. The site covers too many genres  of music to list here, but to give you an idea you can browse Rock’s Backpages  for genres including prog rock to rockabilly, jazz to space rock, Japanese pop to trip hop; yup, all these any more more genered are covered is this database.

 

Sure, this is a great site for finding articles for assignments, but it is also a wonderful place to browse and learn about new genres of music, classic to contemporary artists, and popular music from around the globe.

 

Links to Rock’s Backpages are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage,
library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage

 

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

 

Rock on, UArts!

James Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

Staff Recommendation – Frank Furness: Architecture and the Violent Mind

51RHPVB4SBL._SX339_BO1,204,203,200_

Looking around Philadelphia, the observant admirer of architecture cannot help but notice a plethora of highly decorated, Victorian Gothic buildings, located here and there in important places. Many of these were designed by none other than the master architect Frank Furness. This biographical work, Frank Furness: Architecture and the Violent Mind, covers the storied life of this 19th century architect. The book begins with his abolitionist upbringing in Philly, and then on to his life-changing experiences in fighting the American Civil War, and then finally embarks into his remarkable career in translating the struggles and hopes of his age into a flamboyant and staggering architectural form. Recommended for anyone with an interest in American and Philadelphia history, particularly those interested in architecture and aesthetics.

This book is located in the Greenfield Library open stacks, at call # 720.92 F98lew.

— Mike Romano, Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – Cultural Resistance: A Reader

tumblr_oktcpnXixC1tmeqwzo1_500Cultural Resistance: A Reader, presents a historical look at the ways in which human cultures have been used and inspired by resistance to oppression. From the English Levellers of the 1600s, to the the 19th century marxists and anarchists, to the feminists and Black power activists of the 20th century, this work explores culture as a weapon through varied and interesting essays. In these pages we hear from such notables as Theodor Adorno, Virginia Woolf, Mikhail Bakhtin, Stuart Hall, Bertolt Brecht, Janice Radway, Abbie Hoffman, and Mahatma Gandhi. We glimpse into how the realms of art, music, and philosophy have helped define resistance. And, importantly, we are presented with examples of how to use and build cultures which create a more just, free, world.

This book is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call # 306.2 C485.

— Mike Romano, Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York Art World

“Institutional thinking tells us to look very, very carefully before leaping—and such thinking virtually guarantees that we’ll never leap at all. As an antidote to this, my motto has been “Act first, think later – that way you might have something to think about.” (174)

shortlifecover

In 1969, the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City hired Marcia Tucker, as their first ever woman curator. Shortly after organizing an exhibition for the post-minimalist artist Richard Tuttle, the Whitney decided to terminate her after receiving dissatisfied reviews regarding the show’s conceptually perplexing style. A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York City Art World, edited by Liza Lou, focuses on Marcia Tucker’s persistent desire to challenge the traditional norms and role of the institution through her radical approach to exhibition-making. Her memoir is adorned with personal details of the curator’s private life while simultaneously providing an insightful perspective behind Marcia Tucker’s decision to open the New Museum of Contemporary Art shortly after being fired from the Whitney.

Recommended for any individual interested in curatorial practices, museum and institutional policies, or to simply learn more about the founder of the New Museum, and her relentless desire to push the boundaries of the New York City art world.

Nichole Seedes, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

This book is accessible through our Ebsco database as an E-book, simply follow the link below, and log-in with your UArts credentials.

Academic EBook Collection Complete

New Database Available!

Why search the web for quality blogs, social media posts, and news sources when ACI does it for you!?!

Screenshot 2017-04-18 12.39.59

A leading aggregator of editorially selected and curated social media and blog publications including news and commentary blogs, ACI Scholarly Blog Index includes high-quality authoritative blogs from experts in all fields of science, social sciences, and the humanities.

Search by keywords, then limit by date, subject, publication/blog title, and more.

Diggin’ on dance? Check out The Dance Journal covering dance in Philadelphia; including this article on dancers Kyle and Dinita Clark who met right here at UArts!

Looking for art history? Browse Art History Unstuffed, by OTIS College of Art & Design’s Professor Jeanne Willette.

Gamer? The National Archive’s Harold Jamie Madigan’s blog The Psychology of Video Games includes an article on “Why being a gamer can help you be a better person.”

Movie fan? ACI Scholarly Blog Index has the Movies Now blog from the LA Times.

(your Music Librarian confesses he got sidetracked writing this announcement thanks to this article on Comic-Con)

Speaking of music and movies, check out the University of Kentucky’s Scott Murphy’s blog, Musicellanea, including his article on “Star War’s triplets in alignment with Holst’s Mars.”

Like the theater? Me too! But you can read why the Flux Factory’s Moragn Meis doesn’t in her article “Why I hate the theater,” featured on the 3QuarksDaily blog.

This is just a small sampling of the blogs and more you’ll find on ACI Scholarly Blog Index.

Links to ACI Scholarly Blog Index are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

OnlineResourcesCallout

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact us.
Enjoy!

New Database Available!

We thought you may be interested in a new database to which we now subscribe:

Musical Theater Songs: The Song Is You
This site gives you over 20 different search options to help you find that perfect musical theater song. The options include voice type, voice range, character age, time signature, original key, ease for accompanist, descriptive characteristics, and more.
Please note: this index does not include sheet music, but rather helps you build a list of songs you could then bring into the library to find the sheet music.
To see if the song is available in the library, click the link to “Find the Sheet Music” then the link for “UARTS Library” :

Inline image 2
The site also gives you options to buy the music from pay sites, but please always visit the library first. Can’t find a song in the library catalog that this site helped you discover? No worries, check with me, Jim Cowen, your Music Reference Librarian (jcowen@uarts.edu) to see if we can help you find what you need.
Links to Musical Theater Songs are available from the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage
You can also search the UArts Library catalog for the name of the database, Musical Theater Songs, to find a link to the site.
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.
We hope you enjoy the search for new songs!

 

Staff Recommendation: Jakob Von Gunten

jakobvonguntent-cover

Jakob Von Gunten is a novel by the mostly forgotten Swiss writer Robert Walser. Published in 1909, the novel tells the story of a boy named Jakob Von Gunten and his time at the Benjementa Institute — a school for servants. The novel is based off of Walser’s own experiences at servant school and as a butler. The title character is also the narrator of the story. He tells his surreal accounts of going to the school, living in a city away from his parents and interacting with the principal and teacher of the school. Even though Jakob is somewhat of an unreliable narrator and all-around snot-nosed brat, his story makes for a fascinating read.

Recommended by Isabella Braun, Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation – Women Warriors by David E. Jones

Xerox BookCentre_1 (6)

All throughout the first thirteen years of our educations we’ve been swamped and regaled with tales of the men who shaped our society into what it is today. We learn about the founding fathers and various kings and popes, but what about the women working both in the spotlight and behind the scenes? Jones presents us with another history, a history filled with women ready to lead armies and topple government expectations, all the while owning their sexuality and the power that comes with it. Here are women who have transcended history and marched into the realm of legend.

Xerox BookCentre_1 (7)                       Xerox BookCentre_2 (8)

Jones takes us to the legendary Amazons and their incredible feats of power and military tactics that placed them squarely in the realm of fearsome myth, and whose legacies helped shape the DC heroine Wonder Woman. After this we visit the Battle Queens of Arabia, Kali’s Daughters of India, the British Isles, Africa, and Asia. We meet women such as Bat Zabbai, who conquered the eastern half of the Roman Empire, and the female pirate Hsi Kai Ching, who terrorized the Chinese government for years and retired as one of the most successful pirates in history. To anyone looking for strong, self-empowered women, this book delivers.

Women Warriors can be found in the Greenfield Library open stacks, call # 355.0082 J713w 1997

– Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Student Assistant

Lynda.com – Tutorials for Everything

Lynda.com is a fantastic website and resource for technology training. University of the Arts’ subscription to the site allows you to access tutorials for a wide range of subjects. On it there are hundreds of online courses that can help you to learn Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Excel, etc., as well as management and presentation skills. The service is connected to LinkedIn and allows you to add skills to your professional profile. You can use this service to seriously beef up your resume and collect a number of work-related skills. You can also choose to follow more general learning paths like “Become a Content Marketer” or “Become a Project Coordinator”.
Learn everything from graphic design to coding through this service made free through University of the Arts’ subscription. Maybe even use it to knock out a New Year’s resolution or two.

One note: The first time you log into Lynda, you have to go through the UArts portal to register. After doing that once and setting up a Lynda account, you can access it directly, including on its mobile app!

Post by Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – My Best Fiend

My Best Fiend is a documentary by the famous German director Werner Herzog about his tumultuous relationship with actor Klaus Kinski. Herzog and Kinski worked together on five films. The documentary details all sides of Kinski’s personality, including examples with massive arguments between Kinski and Herzog, some even involving the film crews.  There are also many parts of the documentary that humanized Kinski. You do not have to watch any of Herzog’s or Kinski’s films to enjoy this story about a crazy relationship between two hardworking men of cinema.
Recommended by Isabella Braun – Music Library Work Study Assistant