New Database Available!

Why search the web for quality blogs, social media posts, and news sources when ACI does it for you!?!

Screenshot 2017-04-18 12.39.59

A leading aggregator of editorially selected and curated social media and blog publications including news and commentary blogs, ACI Scholarly Blog Index includes high-quality authoritative blogs from experts in all fields of science, social sciences, and the humanities.

Search by keywords, then limit by date, subject, publication/blog title, and more.

Diggin’ on dance? Check out The Dance Journal covering dance in Philadelphia; including this article on dancers Kyle and Dinita Clark who met right here at UArts!

Looking for art history? Browse Art History Unstuffed, by OTIS College of Art & Design’s Professor Jeanne Willette.

Gamer? The National Archive’s Harold Jamie Madigan’s blog The Psychology of Video Games includes an article on “Why being a gamer can help you be a better person.”

Movie fan? ACI Scholarly Blog Index has the Movies Now blog from the LA Times.

(your Music Librarian confesses he got sidetracked writing this announcement thanks to this article on Comic-Con)

Speaking of music and movies, check out the University of Kentucky’s Scott Murphy’s blog, Musicellanea, including his article on “Star War’s triplets in alignment with Holst’s Mars.”

Like the theater? Me too! But you can read why the Flux Factory’s Moragn Meis doesn’t in her article “Why I hate the theater,” featured on the 3QuarksDaily blog.

This is just a small sampling of the blogs and more you’ll find on ACI Scholarly Blog Index.

Links to ACI Scholarly Blog Index are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

OnlineResourcesCallout

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact us.
Enjoy!

New Database Available!

We thought you may be interested in a new database to which we now subscribe:

Musical Theater Songs: The Song Is You
This site gives you over 20 different search options to help you find that perfect musical theater song. The options include voice type, voice range, character age, time signature, original key, ease for accompanist, descriptive characteristics, and more.
Please note: this index does not include sheet music, but rather helps you build a list of songs you could then bring into the library to find the sheet music.
To see if the song is available in the library, click the link to “Find the Sheet Music” then the link for “UARTS Library” :

Inline image 2
The site also gives you options to buy the music from pay sites, but please always visit the library first. Can’t find a song in the library catalog that this site helped you discover? No worries, check with me, Jim Cowen, your Music Reference Librarian (jcowen@uarts.edu) to see if we can help you find what you need.
Links to Musical Theater Songs are available from the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage
You can also search the UArts Library catalog for the name of the database, Musical Theater Songs, to find a link to the site.
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.
We hope you enjoy the search for new songs!

 

Staff Recommendation: Jakob Von Gunten

jakobvonguntent-cover

Jakob Von Gunten is a novel by the mostly forgotten Swiss writer Robert Walser. Published in 1909, the novel tells the story of a boy named Jakob Von Gunten and his time at the Benjementa Institute — a school for servants. The novel is based off of Walser’s own experiences at servant school and as a butler. The title character is also the narrator of the story. He tells his surreal accounts of going to the school, living in a city away from his parents and interacting with the principal and teacher of the school. Even though Jakob is somewhat of an unreliable narrator and all-around snot-nosed brat, his story makes for a fascinating read.

Recommended by Isabella Braun, Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation – Women Warriors by David E. Jones

Xerox BookCentre_1 (6)

All throughout the first thirteen years of our educations we’ve been swamped and regaled with tales of the men who shaped our society into what it is today. We learn about the founding fathers and various kings and popes, but what about the women working both in the spotlight and behind the scenes? Jones presents us with another history, a history filled with women ready to lead armies and topple government expectations, all the while owning their sexuality and the power that comes with it. Here are women who have transcended history and marched into the realm of legend.

Xerox BookCentre_1 (7)                       Xerox BookCentre_2 (8)

Jones takes us to the legendary Amazons and their incredible feats of power and military tactics that placed them squarely in the realm of fearsome myth, and whose legacies helped shape the DC heroine Wonder Woman. After this we visit the Battle Queens of Arabia, Kali’s Daughters of India, the British Isles, Africa, and Asia. We meet women such as Bat Zabbai, who conquered the eastern half of the Roman Empire, and the female pirate Hsi Kai Ching, who terrorized the Chinese government for years and retired as one of the most successful pirates in history. To anyone looking for strong, self-empowered women, this book delivers.

Women Warriors can be found in the Greenfield Library open stacks, call # 355.0082 J713w 1997

– Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Student Assistant

Lynda.com – Tutorials for Everything

Lynda.com is a fantastic website and resource for technology training. University of the Arts’ subscription to the site allows you to access tutorials for a wide range of subjects. On it there are hundreds of online courses that can help you to learn Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Excel, etc., as well as management and presentation skills. The service is connected to LinkedIn and allows you to add skills to your professional profile. You can use this service to seriously beef up your resume and collect a number of work-related skills. You can also choose to follow more general learning paths like “Become a Content Marketer” or “Become a Project Coordinator”.
Learn everything from graphic design to coding through this service made free through University of the Arts’ subscription. Maybe even use it to knock out a New Year’s resolution or two.

One note: The first time you log into Lynda, you have to go through the UArts portal to register. After doing that once and setting up a Lynda account, you can access it directly, including on its mobile app!

Post by Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – My Best Fiend

My Best Fiend is a documentary by the famous German director Werner Herzog about his tumultuous relationship with actor Klaus Kinski. Herzog and Kinski worked together on five films. The documentary details all sides of Kinski’s personality, including examples with massive arguments between Kinski and Herzog, some even involving the film crews.  There are also many parts of the documentary that humanized Kinski. You do not have to watch any of Herzog’s or Kinski’s films to enjoy this story about a crazy relationship between two hardworking men of cinema.
Recommended by Isabella Braun – Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation – Still Life with Woodpecker

Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins is a witty and funny — but never corny — love story between an environmentalist vegetarian princess, Leigh-Cherri, and an on-the-run outlaw, The Woodpecker, who was in jail for bombing a number of buildings. They both meet at a environmental convention in Hawaii where the Woodpecker wants to wreak havoc at and Princess is simply trying to enjoy her vacation. The pair end up becoming somewhat star- crossed lovers and are separated by the Princess Leigh-Cherri’s royal parents who do not approve of their relationship. The rest of the story follows both characters as they attempt to reunite. In typical Robbins fashion the whole novel has absurd scenes that will make you question what you’re reading. Some of the covered topics include aliens, redheads, and a pack of Camel cigarettes. This novel will keep you laughing and genuinely curious as to whether or not the Princess and the Woodpecker will live happily ever after.

Recommended by Isabella Braun, Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Global Philadelphia: Immigrant Communities Old and New

41brs4QTa3L._SX330_BO1,204,203,200_

Philadelphia is a city which is built upon layers of immigration. In the centuries since its founding, people have traversed oceans to land here and make this their home, transforming our city in the process. These essays include stories and struggles of older arrivals such as the Germans, Irish, Jews, Puerto Ricans, Chinese, and Italians, and also cover the immigration taking place in more recent history, which includes groups such as Indians, Mexicans, Southeast Asians, and Ethiopians. This book helps the reader understand how immigration is and has been vital for a vibrant and competitive Philadelphia, and how the immigrants and their descendants continue to change and enhance the cultural face of our city.

This title is currently on exhibit at the Greenfield Library, and is available for immediate check-out, call number 305.800974811 G51t.

–Mike Romano, Circulation Assistant

Staff recommendation- Why I Wake Early, by Mary Oliver

418F9P4AatL

Mary Oliver’s poems have a soft natural glow to them. They deal with a wonder for nature and the world around us. Each poem gives an opportunity to refocus on the parts of our day that are often forgotten like the wind in the leaves and the ants beneath our feet. 

The effect of Mary Oliver’s poetry is quieting and eye-opening. In tough times, people often turn to poetry to find a sense of solace or understanding. Mary Oliver speaks to the broader troubles of the world by reminding us of the world we are in and often fail to be aware of or marvel at.

Greenfield Open Stacks 811.54 O143w

– Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – The Blessings, by Elise Juska

19622560

In her most recent novel, The Blessings, Elise Juska explores the connections between members of a large family. From birth to death, divorce and strained marriages, leaving home for the first time and learning what it means to take on the traditions of the family, this work follows the lives of a close-knit Irish-Catholic family and gives the reader no shortage of personal triumphs and losses to explore and understand. Through her deft use of differing narrators spanning four generations of the Blessings’s family tree, Juska pushes us to ask ourselves how much of our identity is shaped by family, and what happens when we step outside those boundaries.

The UArts Libraries is proud is recognize Juska as an esteemed faculty member of our own institution.

Greenfield Open Stacks – 813 J98b 2014

Lauralee Martin, Work Study Library Assistant at the Greenfield Library