Digital Library of the Week: On the Edge – The Hidden Art of Fore-Edge Book Painting

On the Edge- The Hidden Art of Fore-Edge Painting is a beautiful gem of an image collection! I know what you’re thinking – “what in the world is fore-edge book painting?” I didn’t have a clue either until I discovered this beautiful collection from the Boston Public Library. The fore-edge of a book is the side opposite the spine; there are three edges of the pages visible – top, bottom, and the non-bound side. These edges are usually undecorated. Sometimes, the edges would be gilded gold…however, fan the pages and, voila!, reveal an intricate painting.

Waterfront Scene on the fore-edge of the book The Poetical Works of Mr. Williams Collins
Waterfront Scene on the fore-edge of the book The Poetical Works of Mr. Williams Collins

To learn more about the process, and watch some terrific videos of the fanning revelation in action, check out the About Fore-Edge Painting section of this website. We also have a great book on the technique, Fore-Edge Painting: A Historical Survey of a Curious Art in Book Decoration. Want to see one in action? Check out Sagmeister: Made You Look by Peter Hall and designed by Sagmeister, Inc.

Award-winning student thanks librarians!

The Greenfield Library had a very nice visit about two weeks ago from UArts Art Education graduate student Aaron Schnittman.  Aaron made extensive use of the UArts Libraries’ staff and services throughout his academic career with us, from making appointments with the reference librarians to making extensive use of interlibrary loan, and stopped by to return all of his materials and say a sincere thank-you for all the assistance he received. It’s what we do in libraries, and we are happy to offer these services!

Aaron and his son Max rev things up in go-karts
Aaron and his son Max rev things up in go-karts

Aaron happens to be this year’s winner of the Art Education Department Graduate Education Committee Award for Excellence in Scholarship for his thesis, An Examination of the Self-Regulated Learning Process of Middle School Students in an Online Art Class. Coincidence that he also used the library more than once? We think not!

Aaron has been working full-time for years as an online art teacher, and found little research material concerned with his specialty. He hopes to publish his thesis as a scholarly journal article. Our congratulations and best wishes to Aaron and his publishing (and racing) future!

Digital Library of the Week: Francisco Goya Prints

Francisco Goya Prints is a collection from Pomona College Museum of Art (hosted by Claremont Colleges Digital Library), which owns first editions of all four sets from Goya’s series of etchings: Los Caprichos (1799), La Tauromaquia (1815-1816), Los Disparates (1815-1824), and Los Desastres de le Guerra (1810-1820). Within many of the etchings are Goya’s dark satire and political protest of war; imagery depicting witchcraft, monsters, and the brutality of war tell the history of Spain in the 1800s. You can search by title, subject, creation date, or just browse through more than 200 high quality images.

etching from La Tauromaquia showing a bullfight
Etching from La Tauromaquia showing a bullfight

To learn more about Goya and view other works by him, search for him by author as Goya, Francisco, 1746-1828 in the UArts catalog or read about him in Oxford Art Online by searching for Goya (Oxford Art Online will require a UArts library barcode log-in from off-campus locations). To learn more about the technique of etching, search for etching as a subject in the UArts catalog or read the various entries on the subject of etching in Oxford Art Online.

Digital Library of the Week: Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers

Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers is a free primary resource collection from the Library of Congress. It includes newspaper pages from 1880-1922 as well as information on newspapers published from 1960 through to the present. Local Pennsylvania papers included are the Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, the Pittsburgh Dispatch, and the Scranton Tribune. See what your home state has to offer! Also, check out some UArts Libraries’ materials on newspapers and journalism to learn more about these invaluable resources.

These are high-resolution images, so you can zoom in for detail and even download pages. Here’s a page from the January 1, 1915 Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger titled “Figures and Floats Conspicuous in Brilliant Array of New Years Mummers Today.