New Additions to ReVIEW

designinform is a collection of three databases: Design Abstracts Retrospective (DAR), Design ProFILES (DP) and ReVIEWReVIEW is digitizing the very best decorative and fine art journals that were published in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. They have just added even more material to their database – and you have access to all of it! Three important art journals are now available for full searching and access through ReVIEW.

The Studio was a highly respected journal published in England. Scholarly articles written by leading art critics highlight early nineteenth century trends in international decorative and fine arts. ReVIEW offers the first fifty volumes, published from 1893-1910.

Similar to The Studio is the German publication Deutsche Kunst und Dekoration. While it also covers international art news, Deutsche Kunst has a strong focus on German, Austrian, Scandinavian, and Central European decorative and fine art. It is written in German, but you can search by artist name or browse the journal for beautiful, high-resolution images. The first twenty-seven volumes, published from 1897-1910, are available.

The latest addition is Art et Decoration, published out of Paris. The journal covers mostly French, Belgian, and Western European art. It is written in French, but you can search by artist name or browse the journal for beautiful, high-resolution images. You will find a lot of the Art Nouveau style and extensive coverage of the Paris Exposition of 1900. Art et Decoration’s first twenty-seven volumes, published from 1897-1910, are available.

ReVIEW informs us that they are now digitizing the first six volumes of The Poster, an extremely rare, English-language journal dedicated to poster art. Look for it in December of this year.

Digital Library of the Week: Philly History

In 2007, when Philadelphia Magazine awarded phillyhistory.org the Best of Philly Website, the article stated, “History buff or not, traveling back in time is pretty darn cool.” How true! Want to see the UArts buildings from way back when? Or check out Center City, the historic houses, or street shots of your Philly neighborhood? Phillyhistory.org is the place.

The city’s photo archive has over 2 million photos dating from the late 1800s and phillyhistory.org is working to make those photos available online. Along with all these great historical scenes, they have a very informative blog and a Flickr page.

Look familiar? It's 320 South Broad Street, our very Hamilton Hall. It's from 1858, when the building housed the Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb.
Look familiar? It's 320 South Broad Street, our very Hamilton Hall. It's from 1858, when the building housed the Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb.

Want to know more about Philadelphia and the history of UArts? Head over to the library. We have a great illustrated book on The University of the Arts co-authored by Sara MacDonald, one of our reference librarians, and Eugene Bolt (find in in the Greenfield or Music Libraries). You’ll find books on the Philadelphia murals, the Mutter Museum and we’re working right now on digitizing the University Archives.

Digital Library of the Week: Dr. Seuss

August 12, 2010 marked the 50th anniversary of the publication of Dr. Seuss’ Green Eggs and Ham. On a bet from his publisher, Theodor Seuss Geisel wrote the book using only 50 words, 49 of which are monosyllabic (“anywhere” is the exception). It’s still in the top 5 best-selling children’s books of all time. Not bad for a $50 bet! However, Dr. Seuss didn’t just write and illustrate children’s books. He also created magazine advertisements and political anti-war cartoons.

One of Dr. Seuss' advertisements for Holly Sugar
One of Dr. Seuss' advertisements for Holly Sugar

Two digital collections from the University of California, San Diego Library provide a well-rounded insight into the motivations behind his artwork. The Advertising Artwork of Dr. Seuss contains a selection of his magazine illustrations for companies such as General Electric, NBC, and Standard Oil.

Dr. Seuss Went to War is a collection of his political cartoons. From 1941-1943, Dr. Seuss was the chief editorial cartoonist for PM, a New York newspaper that was published during the 1940s. There are 400 cartoons here!

Editorial cartoon for PM from August 18, 1942
Editorial cartoon for PM from August 18, 1942

SuMFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Mel Chin

Mel Chin is a well-established artist who is always thinking outside the box. His conceptual work often blends installation art and science, particularly environmental studies. He is represented by the Frederieke Taylor Gallery in New York City, and the Museum of Modern Art owns a few of his drawings.

Mel Chin's Revival Field
Mel Chin's Revival Field

To find out more about his work, watch his interview during the first season of Art 21 (ask at the Greenfield Library circulation desk for GD 336 or watch it online). There are also many articles on him; these can be found through WilsonWeb on the UArts Libraries’ website (if you are off campus, you will have to log on with your name and library barcode).

Eric Bookhardt, in “From Field Testing to Even Exchange: Mel Chin discusses Operation Paydirt and Safehouse,” (in Art Papers from January/February 2009) provides an in-depth look at two of Chin’s installation works. Bookhardt introduces Chin by calling his art “an amalgam of the scientific and poetic.”

In another Art Papers (September/October 2006) article, Christopher French reviews the 1988-2005 survey exhibition of Chin’s work, Do Not Ask Me, at the Station Museum of Contemporary Art. This essay follows the exhibition in that it discusses Chin’s smaller works – assemblage sculptures.

Victoria Vesna, in “Mel Chin – Provocative Eco-Art in Action,” (Art Journal, Spring 2006) is a thought provoking essay on Chin’s environmental work. Vesna notes that Chin creates “work that addresses issues of habitat devastation, restoration, and sustaining the planet’s biodiversity.”

The Greenfield Library also has two books that contain material on Chin and his artwork. Tom Finkelpearl’s Dialogues in Public Art: Interviews (Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2000) includes an interview with Chin regarding his public environmental artworks. Other artists included in the text are Vito Acconci, Maya Lin, and Krzysztof Wodiczko. Find it in Greenfield Library Open Stacks: 701.03 F495d.

Linda Weintraub’s Art on the Edge and Over: Searching for Art’s Meaning in Contemporary Society (Litchfield: Art Insights, Inc., 1996) is a terrific complication of essays and includes one on Mel Chin and his environmental works. Find it in the Greenfield Library Open Stacks: 709.04 W433a.

Find out more information on the Summer MFA Food for Thought lecture series. Lectures are about an hour long, free and open to the public.

SuMFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Linn Meyers

Linn Meyers has an MFA from the California College of the Arts and has won many awards, including a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. Her traditional canvas paintings and site-specific paintings have been shown internationally.

One of Linn Meyers' ink drawings on mylar
One of Linn Meyers' ink drawings on mylar

Meyers’ work has been reviewed in many publications. A few of these articles are available through LexisNexis Academic and WilsonWeb on the UArts Libraries’ website.

Frank Cebulski, in “The Space Between at SJICA,” (Artweek, June 2008) describes, in detail, the process Meyer’s employed for one of her “beautiful optical” site-specific drawings. Also view Douglas Witmer’s blog video posting of Meyer’s working on her piece for The Space Between.

In “Artist Goes Flat-Out to Draw the Viewer in,” (The Washington Post, 20 February 2009), M. O’Sullivan reviews Meyer’s two large-scale wall drawings (along with smaller works on Mylar) at the University of Maryland’s Art Gallery. O’Sullivan notes that “it isn’t hard to feel something powerful here.”

Find out more information on the Summer MFA Food for Thought lecture series. Lectures are about an hour long, free and open to the public.