Welcome Back!

The University Libraries staff extends a special welcome to new students and faculty and is, of course, pleased to welcome back those who are returning from their summer break. We are ready to assist you with finding materials for your courses or for any other kind of research need and look forward to seeing you all in the libraries. Don’t hesitate to contact anyone on the library staff about making recommendations for the library collections or to request assistance for anything from finding books, recordings, images, etc., to planning library instructional sessions for your class.

Those of you who are returning will notice some changes to the library facilities. The Music Library has added new shelving to the listening area and the entrance to the Music Library has been reconfigured and improved. Work on the doorway is continuing but should be completed within the next week or so. Carrels have been placed on the lower level of the Greenfield Library for individual study areas. We invite you to stop by and take a look at these improvements.

Please also take a few moments to view an exhibit of books from the Libraries’ Special Collections located in the first floor hallway of Anderson Hall. All books in Special Collections, including those in the exhibit, are listed in the Libraries’ online catalog and can be used in the library; just ask for them at the circulation desks.

Watch this space for information about library tours (participate and you may win a $100 prize!), workshops, online resources, staff recommendations, and other news and information about library activities. If you have suggestions for additional news entries, let us know. The library staff is here to assist you so don’t hesitate to contact us. Best wishes for a productive and successful semester!

University Libraries September Exhibitions

The University Libraries welcomes new and returning students and faculty with two UArts-focused exhibitions.

Visual Arts items from Special Collections
Visual Arts items from Special Collections

Anderson Hall in the first floor hallway display cases: What’s Your Major? From ballet programs of the Forties and a how-to book on playing the spoons, to an exhibition catalog signed by two notable filmmakers and a book of minstrel songs from 1882, the Special Collections of the University Libraries offer a wide range of rare and interesting pieces. Stop by and view some beautiful items representing the majors offered by the University.

Greenfield Library Display Case: Homegrown highlights artists books created by UArts faculty and staff. These items are from the Greenfield Library’s Book Arts collection.

Music items from Special Collections
Music items from Special Collections

Library staff recommendation: The Book of Symbols

The Book of Symbols
Editor-in-Chief: Ami Ronnberg
Editor: Kathleen Martin
302.2223 B644r Greenfield Reference

“Art doesn’t reproduce the visible. It renders visible” (Paul Klee).

There have been many books on symbols before this one, published by the Archive for Research in Archetypal Symbolism. However, none of them compare to the beauty, creative expression, and research of The Book of Symbols. The artwork selected represents all cultures and time periods of mankind, creating a global perspective while focusing on a set of well-chosen images with full descriptions. Edited by Jungian expert Kathleen Martin and including short bibliographies, each essay is a blend of historical fact and dreamlike ideas, inspiring the artist within the reader.

While this is a reference book, available for in-library use, please feel free to make scans of the essays and images reflecting your favorite ideas, rendered visible.

Recommended by Shannon Robinson

Digital Resources of the Week: PhilaPlace

PhilaPlace: Sharing Stories from the City of Neighborhoods, created by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (our neighbor, at 13th & Locust), tells the stories of Philadelphia’s neighborhoods. The interactive website focuses on particularly on two neighborhoods whose immigrants and working class citizens have dramatically shaped the history of the city: Old Southwark and the Greater Northern Liberties. On the PhilaPlace Map you’ll discover local items like The Clef Club at 738 South Broad Street and photographs of South Street contributed by Philadelphia College of Art (now UArts) alumna Peggy Hartzell.

"13th n' South - That's Us" - 1969 photography by Peggy Hartzell
"13th n' South - That's Us" - 1969 photography by Peggy Hartzell

There is a lot of Philadelphia culture and history to explore on the Topics page and an informative blog. This is a terrific way to learn about your new home and all the arts, culture, and history it has to offer. Perhaps as you spend more time here in Philadelphia, you’ll want to share your story too!

Want to know more about Philadelphia and the history of UArts? Head over to the library. We have a great illustrated book on The University of the Arts co-authored by Sara MacDonald, one of our reference librarians, and Eugene Bolt (find in in the Greenfield or Music Libraries). You’ll find books on the Philadelphia murals, Philadelphia architecture, the Mutter Museum and we’re working right now on digitizing the University Archives. Want to know more? Check out our Philadelphia subject guide.

Library staff recommendation: Lee Miller: Portraits from a Life

Lee Miller: Portraits from a Life
By Richard Calvocoressi
779 M615c Greenfield Open Stacks

Lee Miller’s photographs are, in my opinion, among the most compelling photographic works that exist in the world today. I was first exposed to her work when I was 16 or so, after being given a book of Man Ray’s photographs in which a portrait of Lee appeared. After that, I was smitten.  She was a close friend to an outstanding number of important and influential artists and poets including Paul Eluard, Man Ray, Pablo Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Max Ernst, and Dorothea Tanning. Her photographs of Picasso alone span more than 20 years. After receiving it as a gift, this particular volume of her work has become very dear to me. Be sure to take a look at the other great volumes we have on this brilliant artist.

The Lives of Lee Miller by Antony Penrose (her son)
779 M615p Greenfield Open Stacks

The Art of Lee Miller by Mark Haworth-Booth
779 M615h Greenfield Open Stacks

The Surrealist and the Photographer:
Roland Penrose and Lee Miller

709.22 Su78d Greenfield Open Stacks

Recommended by Casey Murphy

Library staff recommendation: The Seven Deadly Sins

The Seven Deadly Sins
Foreword by Ian Fleming
824.008 Se82f Greenfield Open Stacks


This compilation of essays, one for each sin, is accompanied by a series of woodcuts entitled The Seven Deadly Sins and the Devil from 1480-1490. The woodcut on the title page is my favorite; it is “The World” from 1414 and personifies all seven sins. The woodcuts first attracted me to this book, but the essays are just as beautiful and witty.

Famous authors such as novelist Angus Wilson and poets Edith Sitwell and W. H. Auden each interpret and analyze a sin. In his introduction to the works, Ian Fleming (writer of the James Bond novels) notes that such an “examination of these famous sins by some of the keenest brains of today has led me to the dreadful conclusion that in fact all these ancient sins, compared with the sins of today, are in fact very close to virtues.”

Read these essays and enjoy the woodcuts – and see if you agree with Mr. Fleming.

Recommended by Shannon Robinson