Digital Resource of the Week: Craft in America

Craft in America is an excellent resource for anyone interested in the history, techniques, and preservation of American arts and design. The organization is dedicated to educating students of all ages about historical and contemporary craft.

Dorothy Gill Barnes, Ella’s Mulberry Marked, 1995, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center
Dorothy Gill Barnes, Ella’s Mulberry Marked, 1995, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center

The website introduces contemporary artisans in all craft media: clay, wood, metal, glass, fiber, and paper/book arts. A section is dedicated to each material, linking to articles on the craftsmanship and history, as well as providing a list of craft galleries, museums, and magazines. The education section discusses craft by themes such as memory and community. The website gives access to virtual exhibitions.

The organization also produces a TV series that airs on PBS. Each episode focuses on a topic and how crafters in each material approach that topic. You can watch much of the series on PBS’ website and also get access to episodes of the show by downloading PBS’ free iPhone or iPad App. Or, borrow the first three episodes from the UArts Libraries.

Finally, check out the book Craft in America published in 2007. It’s full of beautiful color images representing all crafts, focusing on American craft communities and education. The UArts Libraries has a copy, of course!

L: Beth Lipman, Candlesticks, Books, Flowers and Fruit, 2010, Courtesy of Heller Gallery   R: Beth Lipman, After You’re Gone, 2008, Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence
L: Beth Lipman, Candlesticks, Books, Flowers and Fruit, 2010, Courtesy of Heller Gallery R: Beth Lipman, After You’re Gone, 2008, Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence

New in ARTstor from UArts Visual Resources: Giuseppe Arcimboldi

Giuseppe Arcimboldi was a renowned Italian artist who first began painting while working for his father, artist Biagio Arcimboldo, in the mid 16th century.

"The Librarian" 1566

After working in several cathedrals, Arcimboldi became a painter of the royal court. The images seen here show some of his most noted works, which involved creating portraits out of various objects that pertained to each subject. These series include depictions of the four seasons, the elements, and more. The humorous and clever nature of his works served as an inspiration to several well-known writers of the 16th century, as well as to the works of future artists.  If you would like to see more works by Arcimboldi, click on an image to be taken directly to ARTstor. For more information about the artist, please visit Grove Art Online.

"The Jurist" 1566

New in ARTstor from UArts Visual Resources: John Baldessari

"Heel" 1986

John Baldessari is an American artist, born in 1931. He is a contemporary conceptual artist who has worked in almost every possible medium. The variety of subjects used in his art is perhaps one of the most intriguing qualities. His works range from simple, stark photographs, to plain printed text, to elaborate collages.  Each piece serves as a way to communicate a larger idea, and does so in a unique and visually appealing way.

While the image shown here is just one example of his earlier work, pieces made as late as 2006 are available on ARTstor. If you would like to see more works by Baldessari, click on the image to be taken directly to ARTstor. For more information about the artist, please visit Grove Art Online.

Digital Resources of the Week for Animation

The Society for Animation Studies is an international group focused on scholarship about animation history and theory. It was founded in 1987 by Dr. Harvey Derenhoff, a prolific author of animation blogs, articles and books who teaches animation at the Savannah College of Art and Design’s Atlanta campus. The Society’s website and Derenhoff’s personal website are great resources for anyone interested in animation.

The Society publishes an open access, scholarly e-journal called Animation Studies. They also have an Animation Bibliography which is constantly updated with links and citations to scholarly sources.

Video still from Tony Sargs and Herbert Dawley's 1921 "The First Circus"
Video still from Tony Sargs and Herbert Dawley's 1921 "The First Circus"

Want to watch some animation? Check out two freely available sets of iTunes podcasts. One is the Origins of American Animation from the Library of Congress. The films are from 1900 to 1921. Also see Pixar: 20 Years of Animation, available from MoMA. You can watch selections from movies such as Cars, Toy Story, and Monsters, Inc.

The UArts Libraries has terrific resources on animation. To start, check out our animation subject guide.

Library staff recommendation: Eva Hesse Drawing

Eva Hesse Drawing
Edited by Catherine de Zegher
Greenfield Open Stacks 741.973 H463d

Eva Hesse Drawing is a book I pick up when I need a bit of inspiration. It is the catalogue to an exhibition curated by Catherine de Zegher and Elisabeth Sussman at The Drawing Center in New York in May of 2006.  The exhibition explored the crossover between Hesse’s sculptures and drawings. Her drawings, in my opinion, are just as magnificent as her sculpture. In fact, on occasion, I prefer her drawings because I can see her hand in them. Her thoughts are often crawling along the margins, always reminding me to stop worrying and let the pencil, pen, paint, etc. fall where it needs. Additionally, this volume is full of insightful essays and many quotations by Hesse, which provide useful background and context for the beautifully printed images. If her drawings intrigue you, be sure to take a look at some of the other titles about Eva Hesse and her work.

Eva Hesse: Spectres 1960
Edited by E. Luanne McKinnon
Greenfield Open Stacks 709.24 H463h

Eva Hesse: Catalogue Raisonné
Edited by Renate Petzinger and Barry Rosen
Greenfield Open Stacks 709.24 H463c  v.1, 709.24 H463c  v.2

Eva Hesse
By Lucy R. Lippard
Greenfield Open Stacks 730.973 H463l

String, Felt, Thread: The Hierarchy of Art and Craft in American Art
By Elissa Auther
Greenfield Open Stacks 709.73 Au814s

Recommended by Casey Murphy

Library staff recommendation: The ACME Novelty Library #19

The ACME Novelty Library #19
By Chris Ware
Greenfield Open Stacks 741.5973 W22a19

The 19th installment of Chris Ware’s ACME Novelty Library continues his ongoing comic Rusty Brown, focusing on Rusty’s father William this time around. Ware shows us a glimpse into William’s past as a newspaper clerk in 1950’s Omaha as he deals with an awkward love affair. This in turn runs parallel with a science fiction story set on Mars. While the comparison may be jarring, Ware is a skilled enough storyteller to highlight the similarities and differences between the stories, and to have it all point to a man filled with regret in the middle of his life. Ware mixes comedy and pathos in this story, and as always it stands on the cusp of tragedy, but the smooth and cartooned style helps to the soften the blow.

Rusty Brown continues in The ACME Novelty Library #20, which focuses on Rusty’s childhood bully, Jordan Lint (Greenfield Open Stacks 741.5973 W22a20).

You can also find these additional works by Chris Ware in the Greenfield collection:

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth
Greenfield Open Stacks 741.5 W22jc

The ACME Novelty Library Collection
Greenfield Special Collections A 741.5973 W22a

Recommended by Mike Sgier
Recommended by Mike Sgier

New in ARTstor from UArts Visual Resources: Georg Baselitz

"The-Oriental--Sick-Oriental--Vision--Upholder-of-the-Faith" 1959

Georg Baselitz, born in 1938, is a German artist. Baselitz was educated in art and began exhibiting work in 1961. Over the course of his career, his works and methods have lead to a heavy influence on German Neo-Expressionist art.

Intent on rebelling against the mainstream, Baselitz has drawn inspiration from various sources such as psychotic art and the art brut movement, enabling him to create very expressive and deeply symbolic works that were sometimes viewed as immoral or obscene. He has continued to evolve over the many years he has given to his craft, and in more recent years he has directed his efforts toward sculpture.

"Red-Green-Man--The-Red-Flag--The-Red-Green-Man" 1965

His work remains intense and powerful. If you would like to see more works by Baselitz, click on an image to be taken directly to ARTstor. For more information about the artist, please visit Grove Art Online.

"Oberon--1st-Orthodox-Salon-64--E.-Neizvestny" 1963-64

WilsonWeb’s Content Moves to EBSCOhost

As of January 2012, one of our favorite article databases, WilsonWeb (OmniFile Full Text, Art Abstracts, Art Index Retrospective, and the Play Index), has moved to the EBSCOhost site.

The content of the databases remains the same, only the interface and branding have changed. The move is a result of EBSCO Industries’ June 2011 acquisition of the H.W. Wilson Company.

Access to the old WilsonWeb site will end on February 1. Please contact our Digital Initiatives & Systems Librarian, Josh Roberts joroberts@uarts.edu, with any questions or concerns.

Many of you are already familiar with EBSCOhost and will welcome the switch. Please note that this change applies only to WilsonWeb and no other resources.

Digital Resource of the Week: Tate

The Tate Collection is comprised of the National Collection of British Art, the National Archive of British Art, and international modern art. With four physical locations in England, the Tate provides a wonderful website for exploring its collection from anywhere.

Each work of art in the collection has its own information page on the website, with images when possible. Search by artist or do a subject search. They also provide an interactive glossary of art terminology. You’ll find works by artists such as Alexander Calder,  Damien Hirst and Sophie Calle.

Damien Hirst's Away from the Flock (1994)
Damien Hirst's Away from the Flock (1994)

Tate Channel lets you watch films by artists (including Rafael Bonachela’s Muse), interviews with artists (such as Mike Nelson), and watch artist performances.

Raoul Hausmann's The Art Critic (1919–20)
Raoul Hausmann's The Art Critic (1919–20)

Tate Papers is an online journal of scholarly articles about artists, museum studies, and visual culture. Each essay has selected terms and artists’ names hyperlinked to online images of example artwork. They also include bibliographies. Read the current issue or browse by category. There are papers on artists such as Richard Serra and topics like The Sublime Object.

The Tate also publishes books and the University Libraries has many of them. Search by author for Tate Gallery or Tate Modern (Gallery) to see a variety of excellent books on artists and art movements.