Staff Recommendation – My Best Fiend

My Best Fiend is a documentary by the famous German director Werner Herzog about his tumultuous relationship with actor Klaus Kinski. Herzog and Kinski worked together on five films. The documentary details all sides of Kinski’s personality, including examples with massive arguments between Kinski and Herzog, some even involving the film crews.  There are also many parts of the documentary that humanized Kinski. You do not have to watch any of Herzog’s or Kinski’s films to enjoy this story about a crazy relationship between two hardworking men of cinema.
Recommended by Isabella Braun – Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation – Still Life with Woodpecker

Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins is a witty and funny — but never corny — love story between an environmentalist vegetarian princess, Leigh-Cherri, and an on-the-run outlaw, The Woodpecker, who was in jail for bombing a number of buildings. They both meet at a environmental convention in Hawaii where the Woodpecker wants to wreak havoc at and Princess is simply trying to enjoy her vacation. The pair end up becoming somewhat star- crossed lovers and are separated by the Princess Leigh-Cherri’s royal parents who do not approve of their relationship. The rest of the story follows both characters as they attempt to reunite. In typical Robbins fashion the whole novel has absurd scenes that will make you question what you’re reading. Some of the covered topics include aliens, redheads, and a pack of Camel cigarettes. This novel will keep you laughing and genuinely curious as to whether or not the Princess and the Woodpecker will live happily ever after.

Recommended by Isabella Braun, Music Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Global Philadelphia: Immigrant Communities Old and New

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Philadelphia is a city which is built upon layers of immigration. In the centuries since its founding, people have traversed oceans to land here and make this their home, transforming our city in the process. These essays include stories and struggles of older arrivals such as the Germans, Irish, Jews, Puerto Ricans, Chinese, and Italians, and also cover the immigration taking place in more recent history, which includes groups such as Indians, Mexicans, Southeast Asians, and Ethiopians. This book helps the reader understand how immigration is and has been vital for a vibrant and competitive Philadelphia, and how the immigrants and their descendants continue to change and enhance the cultural face of our city.

This title is currently on exhibit at the Greenfield Library, and is available for immediate check-out, call number 305.800974811 G51t.

–Mike Romano, Circulation Assistant