Staff Recommendation – Stonewall Uprising (film)

Stonewall Bar 1969 – Disturbance at Sheridan Square, NYC. Scenes at Christopher St. and 7th Ave. South with police trying to clear crowds. Pictured, Stonewall Inn which was raided one day last week. July 2, 1969

In 60s-era New York, homosexuality was pathologized, criminalized, and punished by law enforcement. The American Psychiatric Association still classified it as a mental disorder, gay sex was punishable by fine or 20 years to life in prison, and routine police raids were conducted of any bars, baths, and spaces queer people were known to frequent.

Despite this, New York was still the big city, and by the 1960s there was a significant queer population that called the Greenwich Village area home, carving out a culture and place for themselves. Yet they were under constant threat.

On June 28, 1969, the Stonewall Inn, a Mafia-owned gay bar, was raided by police on a routine attack. After several arrests were made, the patrons of the bar, as well as the growing crowd outside snapped – after years of oppression, enough was enough. Sparked by some of the most vulnerable within the queer community – trans people and cross-dressers – the crowd began refusing arrest, physically defending themselves, and attempting to drive the police away, trapping some within the bar itself. The scene became one that some people described as an all-out rebellion which continued for days. In the months that followed, queer liberation organizing sprang into high gear, sparking a seminal event in the American LGBTQ rights movement which drove forward social progress in the coming decades.

Produced as part of the PBS American Experience series, Stonewall Uprising is a collection of interviews and stories by those that lived these events. Archival documents, narrative commentary, and, most of all, eyewitness accounts give shape to this important story throughout the film. There is no better time than Pride Month to learn more about these events where it all began, and how they still reverberate in today’s politics and culture.

This film is available through the library’s subscription database, Academic Video Online (Alexander St. Press), in a series of parts.

— Mike Romano, Music Circulation Assistant

Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

New theater database!

Want to go “behind the scenes” of theater productions from around the world? Well, then, let us introduce you to a new database provided by the University Libraries: Performance Design Archive Online!

From the 17th century through to the present day, Performance Design Archive Online covers so many aspects of theater production design,  including scenic and set design, lighting design, sound design, costume design,  and makeup.

This database contains a range of materials from books and periodicals, to archival materials and instructional videos, and from sketches & technical drawings, to models and more.

Check out this list of genres/performance types covered:

Want to explore this list?
Visit library.uarts.edu and under “Online Resources” a link to Performance Design Archive Online is available via either the  Reference Sources or All Databases, A-Z pages. 

 For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.

 

Once into Performance Design Archive Online you can browse by genre to get the list above, in addition to five other browse options:

(click on the image above to enlarge)

And of course there is a search option to search out your favorite show or designer, as well as options to limit by area of design, content type,  genre, date, and more.

If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me – your library liaison to the Brind School of Theater Arts. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Jim Cowen
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

 

New database of modern popular music!

From acid house to zydeco,
from Acapulco to Zanzibar,
Bloomsbury Popular Music
provides worldwide coverage of modern popular music.

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Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World,
is a great place to start your research on popular music, and a great place to investigate something fun for your own interests.

Looking for information on a particular album? See if one of the 120+ 33 1/3 book series has the album you are looking for!
Each volume provides in-depth analysis of an influential album or event. A great mix of music is covered, ranging from U2’s Achtung Baby, to the music from the Super Mario Brothers video game, to Miles Davis’ Bitches BrewThe new global 33 1/3 series focuses on popular music from around the world and is growing regularly.

Also growing is the expanding collection of scholarly books, with a minimum of 5 titles being added annually.
Some cool topics are covered in these books, ranging from
the history of the music video to San Francisco ‘s music scene in the 60s.

This site even has a fun timeline of popular music covering the 1960s to today!

Links to the Bloomsbury Popular Music  database are available on the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage: library.uarts.edu. Find them at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section.

UArts Library Homepage
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Rock on, UArts!

 

Jim Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

New database: The online library of pop music journalism!

RockBanner

Interested in reading up on LL Cool J or Ke$ha?

Want to listen to an audio interview with
Black Sabbath’s Tony Iommi or Ozzy Osbourne?

Curious to learn more about industrial music or Scandinavian pop?

How about an unpublished 2011 interview with the late
Chris Cornell?

Worry not: the recently added database Rock’s Backpages has that and so much more!

 

RockPick

With over 30,000 articles by music journalists collected over the last 50 years, Rock’s Backpages covers a spectrum of artists ranging from Aaliyah to ZZ Top. The site covers too many genres  of music to list here, but to give you an idea you can browse Rock’s Backpages  for genres including prog rock to rockabilly, jazz to space rock, Japanese pop to trip hop; yup, all these any more more genered are covered is this database.

 

Sure, this is a great site for finding articles for assignments, but it is also a wonderful place to browse and learn about new genres of music, classic to contemporary artists, and popular music from around the globe.

 

Links to Rock’s Backpages are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage,
library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage

 

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

 

Rock on, UArts!

James Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

New Database Available!

Why search the web for quality blogs, social media posts, and news sources when ACI does it for you!?!

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A leading aggregator of editorially selected and curated social media and blog publications including news and commentary blogs, ACI Scholarly Blog Index includes high-quality authoritative blogs from experts in all fields of science, social sciences, and the humanities.

Search by keywords, then limit by date, subject, publication/blog title, and more.

Diggin’ on dance? Check out The Dance Journal covering dance in Philadelphia; including this article on dancers Kyle and Dinita Clark who met right here at UArts!

Looking for art history? Browse Art History Unstuffed, by OTIS College of Art & Design’s Professor Jeanne Willette.

Gamer? The National Archive’s Harold Jamie Madigan’s blog The Psychology of Video Games includes an article on “Why being a gamer can help you be a better person.”

Movie fan? ACI Scholarly Blog Index has the Movies Now blog from the LA Times.

(your Music Librarian confesses he got sidetracked writing this announcement thanks to this article on Comic-Con)

Speaking of music and movies, check out the University of Kentucky’s Scott Murphy’s blog, Musicellanea, including his article on “Star War’s triplets in alignment with Holst’s Mars.”

Like the theater? Me too! But you can read why the Flux Factory’s Moragn Meis doesn’t in her article “Why I hate the theater,” featured on the 3QuarksDaily blog.

This is just a small sampling of the blogs and more you’ll find on ACI Scholarly Blog Index.

Links to ACI Scholarly Blog Index are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

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For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact us.
Enjoy!

New Database Available!

We thought you may be interested in a new database to which we now subscribe:

Musical Theater Songs: The Song Is You
This site gives you over 20 different search options to help you find that perfect musical theater song. The options include voice type, voice range, character age, time signature, original key, ease for accompanist, descriptive characteristics, and more.
Please note: this index does not include sheet music, but rather helps you build a list of songs you could then bring into the library to find the sheet music.
To see if the song is available in the library, click the link to “Find the Sheet Music” then the link for “UARTS Library” :

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The site also gives you options to buy the music from pay sites, but please always visit the library first. Can’t find a song in the library catalog that this site helped you discover? No worries, check with me, Jim Cowen, your Music Reference Librarian (jcowen@uarts.edu) to see if we can help you find what you need.
Links to Musical Theater Songs are available from the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage, library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage
You can also search the UArts Library catalog for the name of the database, Musical Theater Songs, to find a link to the site.
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.
We hope you enjoy the search for new songs!

 

Lynda.com – Tutorials for Everything

Lynda.com is a fantastic website and resource for technology training. University of the Arts’ subscription to the site allows you to access tutorials for a wide range of subjects. On it there are hundreds of online courses that can help you to learn Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Excel, etc., as well as management and presentation skills. The service is connected to LinkedIn and allows you to add skills to your professional profile. You can use this service to seriously beef up your resume and collect a number of work-related skills. You can also choose to follow more general learning paths like “Become a Content Marketer” or “Become a Project Coordinator”.
Learn everything from graphic design to coding through this service made free through University of the Arts’ subscription. Maybe even use it to knock out a New Year’s resolution or two.

One note: The first time you log into Lynda, you have to go through the UArts portal to register. After doing that once and setting up a Lynda account, you can access it directly, including on its mobile app!

Post by Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

UArts 140th #tbt Posts!

Have you checked out the University Libraries’ series of #tbt posts in honor of the University’s 140th anniversary?

You should!

Search Instagram for the hashtag #UArtsArchivesTBT, or visit:  https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/uartsarchivestbt

This is an ongoing series, so be sure to follow and check the UArts Libraries Instagram account regularly.

And boy, does this series have everything!

Students chilling on the steps of Hamilton Hall? Check.

Students sitting on the steps of Dorrance Hamilton Hall

Historic Philly shots? Check.

333 South Broad Street

Student makers making? Check.

Dance students practicing with labanotation score

Faculty engagingCheck.

Ben Eisenstat advises a student in an illustration class

Art installationsCheck.

Art installation at Hamilton Hall copy

A graduation photo from 1893!?!?! Check.

PMSIA class of 1893

Now, when you find yourself asking: where do they get all these wonderful photos?!?

Well the UArts Archives of course! All of the #tbt photos posted to Instagram -and many, many more- are available via the UArts Digital Collections page, accessible right through the good ol’ library homepage: library.uarts.edu.

The UArts Digital Collections contain not only photos from the UArts Archives, but also student work, campus event photos and videos, and other special digital collections!

Come celebrate 140home years of UArts history with us! 

Searching for Videos

There are a number of ways to search the library catalog for videos (by which we mean DVD, VHS, Blu-Ray, and streaming). All of the videos physically owned by the UArts Libraries are in the library catalog.

  1. Go to library.uarts.edu and click the catalog link at the upper right.

Arrow to catalog

  1. In the search by: box you can:

video search by box

  • search by Author for directors, choreographers, composers, and performers. Remember to search LAST NAME first, for example: Scorsese, Martin
  • search by Title if you know it.
  • search by Keyword to find a film in a collection. Put quotation marks around phrases, e.g., “andalusian dog” or “all of me” or “cave of the heart”
  • search by Subject. There are lots of subject headings; these are a few suggestions.

feature films                            operas–film adaptations

documentary films                musical films

science fiction films              concert films

  1. In the search in: box, select Video. This will search for all video formats: VHS, DVD, Blu-Ray, and streaming.

video search in box

  1. Enter your search terms and click  Search!

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Just want to browse and see what we have?

  1. Go to http://library.uarts.edu/
  2. Select catalog from the yellow bar, top right.
  3. Select Call Number Search [on the right]
  4. Select u Search for other call numbers [click open the triangle]

Read the directions on the screen and follow the examples:

MD for Music Library DVDs

MV for Music Library videos

GD for Greenfield Library DVDs

GV for Greenfield Library videos

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Once you find a video, jot down the call number, then go to the Greenfield or Music circulation desk to request it.

The UArts Libraries also subscribe to a number of large streaming video databases. See them at http://library.uarts.edu/eresources/audio.html. You can access most of them from anywhere by signing in with your UArts user name and password.