Category Archives: Digital Resources

Kanopy

Kanopy is the newest video database available to the UArts community. With over 12,000 videos available to stream online both on and off campus, Kanopy vastly increases the UArts Libraries’ video collection. These thousands of videos are divided into ten categories: Film & Popular, The Arts, Business, Education (K-12), Global Studies & Languages, Health, Media & Communications, Sciences, Social Sciences, and Technical Training. These are further broken down into subcategories which offer you suggestions over a gigantic variety of topics.

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New movies are constantly being added as well. On the front page of Kanopy, there are various scrolling selections of movies. At the very top are new additions but there are also more personalized categories, such as “Student Summer Pics,” “Celebrate LGBT,” or “Independent Cult and Horror Films.”

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Kanopy also provides films and TV broadcasts from renowned distribution companies and broadcasting networks such as The Criterion Collection, PBS, The BBC, Janson Media, Kino Lorber Edu, and First Run Features, as well as many others.

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Additionally, members of the UArts community are able to create their own personal profiles. With these, students, faculty and staff can create playlists, save clips from videos, add videos to their “watch list” to view later, and see their viewing history.

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There is something for everyone on Kanopy, from 50s horror movies to French art films to multi-part Ken Burns documentaries. Go to library.uarts.edu today to give it a try!

Lynda.com

Lynda.com is the preeminent software tutorial website currently on the market. And through UArts, you can access it for free! Lynda.com offers tutorials on a wide variety of topics, from Adobe’s Creative Cloud network of software to business and IT to education and many other topics. Whether you’re just trying to familiarize yourself with a new piece of software or looking for some new tips to help you expedite or enhance your creative process, Lynda.com is sure to have something for you.

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The tutorials offered are helpful and in-depth, narrated and demonstrated by professionals who guide you through every step and more often than not include example files for you to follow along and try out the principles taught for yourself. Also provided are transcripts of what the narrator is saying and an area to take notes that keep track of what time in the video you wrote them.

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In addition to the tutorials, Lynda.com also offers various videos more along the lines of short documentaries and video blogs from and by various professionals in their respective fields.

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Finally, Lynda.com provides you with many other non-software tutorials to help improve many talents such as presentation skills, public speaking and time/project management.

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Lynda.com is a valuable tool to any student learning about their field who wants to improve or expand their talents. Look for more posts from the UArts Libraries about various Lynda.com tutorials and videos!

Library iPad Apps – The Fantastic Flying Books…

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore is a beautiful iPad app adaptation of the Academy Award-winning short film of the same name directed by William Joyce and Brandon Oldenburg.

The app follows the same story as the short film, but also includes interactive sequences that enhance the user’s experience. From simple animations when you tap on certain parts in the story to animations such as a piano keyboard for you to play with, the app is downright adorable.

The other main difference between the film and the app is the inclusion of narration by Mike Martindale. While the film is without dialogue, the app as well as the book adaptation include a written story describing the events of the film. Though the story is obviously geared towards younger audiences, it is still quaint and touching enough to be enjoyed by all lovers of books and stories.

http://moonbotstudios.com/the-fantastic-flying-books-of-mr-morris-lessmore-storybook-app/#.VDUuMyldXDw

 

International Encyclopedia of Dance

 

Are you interested in any or all aspects of dance? International Encyclopedia of Dance is a great starting point. In its print form it’s a 6-volume encyclopedia published in 1998 that was the first true encyclopedia of dance published (and received multiple awards, by the way). The online version, published by Oxford University Press, can of course be updated, and can be accessed anywhere by current UArts students. Articles can be emailed to any email address, and most entries have a selected bibliography of books, articles, and sometimes videos. Look up tutu, footwear, scenic design, lighting, Merce Cunningham, or Bakst!

To get to it, go to http://library.uarts.edu/. Under ONLINE RESOURCES select Reference Sources and then scroll down to International Encyclopedia of Dance.

Music Resources Online

Now available on Digication: Music Library Online Resources

The Internet is crammed with so much information that it can be dizzying to find exactly what you’re looking for. Furthermore, there is always the risk that a lot of what a Google search pulls up isn’t particularly reliable, accurate, or up-to-date. For your convenience Music Library staff have hand-picked and compiled a portfolio filled with interesting and informative online resources that will help you with your next term paper, performance, or simply for your personal enjoyment. We’ve included not only annotated lists of our subscription databases and e-journals, but hundreds of valuable, open access (aka free!) sources so you may access all the online resources from our catalog in one place.

What you’ll find:

Open Access Databases

Organized by subject or resource type are numerous open access databases from a variety of notable sources, including the Library of Congress, New York Public Library, and the British Library. Available on these databases are a wide range of resource types, such as sheet music (International Music Score Library Project), sound collections (The Monterey Jazz Festival Collection at Stanford University), dictionaries (Virginia Tech Multimedia Music Dictionary), and much more.

Open Access E-Journals

It is hard to ignore that many newspapers, magazines, and journals are eschewing print in favor of digital publication. Despite their presence online, most of these publications can only be accessed through paid subscriptions. However, there are many scholarly, peer-reviewed journals that can be accessed free of charge. We’ve selected several to showcase here, which encompass a wide variety of music-related subjects. Browse through such diverse titles as Ntama: Journal of African Music and Pop Culture, Voices: a World Forum for Music Therapy, Popular Entertainment Studies, and many more.

Subscription Databases (UArts Only)

Unlike the above resources, the databases in this section are available to current UArts students, faculty, and staff. They include numerous audio collections (including, but not limited to, Naxos Music Library and Music Online (Alexander Street Press), where you can listen to old favorites or discover new ones (and, unlike Youtube, you will never encounter ads or poor quality recordings). A number of reference sources are also available, including those at African American Song and Oxford Music Online, which include scholarly essays, biographies, and more.  If accessing any of the databases off-campus, you will be required to log in with your UArts email information.

Subscription E-Journals (UArts Only)

In the final section is a list of online journals we subscribe to. Titles include (but definitely not limited to!) Computer Music Journal, Eric Nemeyer’s Jazz Inside, and Journal of Research in Music Education. A vast majority of these journals are also available, in print, at the Music Library, in case you grow tired of looking at a backlit screen.

 

 

 

From Special Collections to Visual Resources; Ad Reinhardt’s How to Look at Art

 

We recently had a request to add some images from Ad Reinhardt’s famous “How to Look” series to ARTstor. We were excited to discover that we had large reproductions of the entire series right here in Special Collections! We have added all 23 images to The Visual Resources Collection of the University of the Arts in ARTstor.

 

Ad Reinhardt’s series on looking at modern art first appeared in PM magazine in 1946. The series gives a humorous look at art history, politics, culture, and art criticism.

The entire series can be seen online in the Visual Resources collection in ARTstor, or in person in Visual Resources and Special Collections, right above the Greenfield Library on the mezzanine of Anderson Hall.

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions about using the Visual Resources and Special Collections, contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian.

UArts Libraries now subscribes to Rhizome.org!

 

Douglas Coupland, I Miss My Pre-Internet Brain (2013)
Douglas Coupland, I Miss My Pre-Internet Brain (2013)

UArts Libraries now subscribes to Rhizome.org!

What is Rhizome?

Rhizome is dedicated to the creation, presentation, preservation, and critique of emerging artistic practices that engage technology. Through open platforms for exchange and collaboration, our website serves to encourage and expand the communities around these practices. Our programs, many of which happen online, include commissions, exhibitions, events, discussion, archives and portfolios. We support artists working at the furthest reaches of technological experimentation as well as those responding to the broader aesthetic and political implications of new tools and media. Our organizational voice draws attention to artists, their work, their perspectives and the complex interrelationships between technology, art and culture.

-Mission Statement, Rhizome.org

 

Focusing on works of art in new media, this resource has been addressing questions of access and preservation since 1999. Through the development of features such as online collections, user portfolios, and member exhibition curation, it has built a vibrant online community.

Human Vectors 1982 (click to play)
Human Vectors 1982 (click to play)

Register for an account to:

  • Create a portfolio and upload work
  • Apply for commi$$ions
  • Vote on commission applications
  • Curate online exhibits and submit work to current exhibits
  • View collections, browse artist portfolios and search archives
  • Keep up with events, discussions and job postings

 

New in ARTstor: 5000 images from Condé Nast

ARTstor has made available 5,000 images from Condé Nast in the Digital Library, including 2,000 cartoons from The New Yorker and nearly 3,000 fashion photographs from the Fairchild Photo Service.

This is the first release of a planned 25,000 images from Condé Nast, which will also include photographs from the Condé Nast Archive of Photography.

Christopher Weyant, The New Yorker Collection

To view these images, go to the ARTstor Digital Library. Click on the Find button in the menu at the top of the screen, and choose “Browse ARTstor by Collection”. Scroll down through the list of choices to get to Condé Nast. Double click on the name to open the entire collection, or click the plus sign in the folder next to the name to chose between Fashion, Costume and Jewelry and Drawings and Watercolors.

For more information on the Condé Nast Collection in ARTstor, visit Artstor’s blog.

For more information on using the ARTstor Digital Library, contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian.

 

 

Borrowing through WorldCat

WorldCat is the most comprehensive online database of resources available to libraries around the globe. “It is astounding that the number of holdings in WorldCat has doubled in less than eight years,” said Jay Jordan, OCLC President and CEO. “This is strong testimony to the power of global library collaboration.”

WorldCat was created in 1971 so that libraries could share cataloging information from a central database, increasing workflow efficiency and the ability to locate and loan materials. It took the OCLC cooperative almost 34 years, from August 26, 1971 to August 11, 2005, to add 1 billion holdings in WorldCat. It has taken just seven years and eight months to add the next billion.

WorldCat spans six millennia of recorded knowledge, from about 4800 B.C. to the present. It encompasses records for books, serials, sound recordings, musical scores, maps, visual materials, mixed materials and computer files.

Did you know that WorldCat is freely available to the UArts community? 625 UArts faculty, students, and staff requested books, videos and articles from WorldCat in 2012. For more information, go to http://library.uarts.edu/about/ill.html

 

JSTOR’s Register & Read Program is Open to All

All current UArts students, faculty and staff have access to JSTOR, the premier scholarly journal article database. Unfortunately when students graduate, or faculty and staff take positions elsewhere, they no longer have access to the UArts subscription. But despair not: anyone can sign up for a JSTOR Register & Read account. Register & Read participants can have access to up to three items from the archive every two weeks. See more at: http://about.jstor.org/news/jstor-rr-historical-scholarship#sthash.avpfOI0H.dpuf or watch the Register & Read video at http://about.jstor.org/video-tutorials

Even if you are a current UArts student, faculty or staff person, signing up for this would be a good thing, and here’s why: UArts only subscribes to part of JSTOR, the Arts & Sciences III collection, which means you don’t have access to every single article in JSTOR. With a Register & Read account, you improve your chances of getting the article you need immediately. We highly recommend giving it a try.