Category Archives: Library Resources

Staff Recommendation – The Artists Way

Do you ever feel creatively blocked, a feeling like all the color and life is lost from your artwork or craft? The Artists Way, by Julia Cameron, is a guidebook designed as a course in creative artistic recovery. Each section of the book describes practices, mindsets, and techniques for creative people, all of which build upon each other, to guide the reader into a more authentic artistic expression. The course is 12 weeks long. The aims include overcoming creative blocks and self-destructive beliefs, while building creative relationships, gaining confidence, and re-connecting to what she believes are the spiritual underpinnings of the creative drive.

In my opinion, this book is a valuable read, even if one does not pursue the entire 12 week course. The various practices described within it encourage one to be more mindful and creative on a consistent basis. For example, the practice of writing a full page of thoughts every morning, described in one chapter early on, can have the effect of bringing one face to face with what is going on the their life, paving the way for action. I recommend this book to anyone with an open mind who feels the need to re-connect to their creative self, whether you want to dive into a full-on course, or could use a few well placed pointers.

The Artists Way is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at BF408 .C175 1992.

Mike Romano, Music Library Circulation Assistant 

New theater database!

Want to go “behind the scenes” of theater productions from around the world? Well let us introduce you to a new database provided by the University Libraries: Performance Design Archive Online!

From the 17th century through to the present day, Performance Design Archive Online covers so many aspects of theater production design,  including scenic & set design, lighting design, sound design, costume design,  and makeup.

This database contains a range of materials from books & periodicals, to archival materials & instructional videos, and from sketches & technical drawings, to models & more.

Check out this list of genres/performance types covered:

Want to explore this list?
Visit library.uarts.edu and under “Online Resources” a link to Performance Design Archive Online is available via either the  Reference Sources or All Databases, A-Z pages. 

 For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.

 

Once into Performance Design Archive Online you can browse by genre to get the list above, in addition to five other browse options:

(click on the image above to enlarge)

And of course there is a search option to search out your favorite show or designer, as well as options to limit by area of design, content type,  genre, date, and more.

If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me – your library liaison to the Brind School of Theater Arts. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Jim Cowen
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

 

New Year, New Call Numbers!

Dear UArts Community Members,

As some of you may already know, we began a large-scale project in the Greenfield Library in the final months of the Fall 2017 semester. We reclassified every item in our collection from Dewey Decimal call numbers to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Okay, so you might be thinking, why? Well, there are a number of reasons.

  • The Library of Congress system is the standard system in the United States for academic libraries.
  •  It is already in use by the UArts Music Library and will help streamline the collections.
  •  It is widely regarded as a more effective system to use for classifying and finding academic materials.

    You will encounter the LC system throughout your research at UArts and beyond. Even a cursory knowledge of its various sections will help you identify places in the library to browse and find materials. You can find out more about how LC call numbers are structured by taking a look at our UArts Libraries Call Number Guide on our website.In addition, we’ve created an LC subject heading guide, as well as corresponding bookmarks, available at the circulation desk:The project included putting new labels on the books, removing every book from the shelves, and then moving the books into their new location.

    From left to right: Barbara Danin, Acquisitions & Administrative Coordinator, Mary Louise Castaldi, Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian, and Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist, sorting books that were relocated to their new sections in the stacks.

    Above: William Rooney, UArts Visual Resources & Special Collections Assistant, sorting books with new LC labels into their new respective aisles.

    As you can see from the images taken over the holiday break, it was organized chaos with books all over the library (on tables, chairs, carts, and the floor), and staff moving in all directions!

    Thanks to the participation of the entire library staff and two very capable student assistants, the project was mostly complete before the beginning of the spring semester despite the interruption of 2.5 snow days. As we continue to power through the final stages of this project, please remember that we are always here to help you navigate your way through the library. Please don’t ever hesitate to visit us or stop by the circulation desk and ask for assistance!


    ~The UArtsLibraries

Staff Recommendation: Fahrenheit 451

As a librarian and an avid fan of reading in general, I’ve read a lot of books. Well, I’ve read a lot, but there certainly are many books that I still haven’t read yet. Fahrenheit 451, a classic (and often banned) modern novel is one of those books that had me saying to myself, “Why have I never read this?!” Especially since this is a true book lover’s book.

But it’s also more than just that. As Neil Gaiman says in the wonderful introduction to this 60th anniversary edition, “This is a book about caring for things. It’s a love letter to books, but I think, just as much, it’s a love letter to people….” Since I think this book is so magical, I won’t spoil the plot. What I want to focus on is this book’s important message, gloriously amplified by Ray Bradbury’s lyrical descriptions (trust me, he makes describing moonlight sound heavenly).

What I loved so much about Fahrenheit 451 is its striking relevance to our world today, which can often be said for these types of dystopian sci-fi novels. Even though I found myself nodding along to Bradbury’s finger-pointing at the horrible aspects of modern society (which are eerily similar to the world of 2018), I also felt reassured to hear a voice who feels the same way I do. Books matter. Stories matter. People matter. Quiet thought and compassion matters. In a world that seems too loud and insane and imploding in on itself at times, it was refreshing to read the words of an author calling out into the void, saying, “Slow down. Look around you. Care more. Read a book.”

You can check out Fahrenheit 451 from the Greenfield Library at call# PS3503 .R167 F3 2013. This special edition of the book also includes historical context essays and reviews for some in-depth reading.

There is also an audio guide available from Greenfield CDs (GCD409), featuring a radio program and Bradbury discussing his work. We also have the 1966 film available behind the Greenfield circulation desk, just ask for call# GD23Coincidentally, HBO will be premiering a new movie version of Fahrenheit 451, to be released Spring of this year. You can watch the teaser trailer here.

~ Recommended by Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist at the Greenfield Library

Staff Recommendation: Look Inside, Cutaway Illustrations and Visual Storytelling

LookInside

This fascinating book reveals a variety of cross sections for the reader to gaze at, appreciate, and ponder. The Velasco brothers take the reader through the history and theory of these artistic cutaways, while delving into their aesthetic and edifying qualities.  From grand 19th century buildings, to modern transportation vehicles, and through wild rain forests and the human body itself, the book covers a lot of ground and explores the myriad ways in which these cross sections can be beautiful and educational. Large colorful prints of the cutaways dominate the book and are a reason, in and of themselves, to pick it up and start learning!

This book is available for check out at the Greenfield Library.  Just stop by the circulation desk and ask for call # T11.8 .V85 2016

Mike Romano – Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

 

Philip K. Dick can be regarded as one of the prominent science fiction authors of the 20th century, with many of his works posthumously inspiring film and television adaptations, such as Total Recall, Terminator, The Man in the High Castle, and Minority Report. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is one of these works, establishing the world of Ridley Scott’s groundbreaking film Blade Runner and its recent sequel, Blade Runner 2049. Like the 1982 movie, Do Androids focuses on Rick Deckhard’s search for rogue Nexus-6 androids in a futuristic, yet very bleak, California. If you are familiar with the classic Harrison Ford feature, this novel might not be what you are expecting, but it delights nonetheless. Characters like Pris, Rachael, and Roy will be recognizable to those who have seen the 1982 movie, as well as other entities that parallel elements in both films. While the films touch on themes of empathy and “What does it mean to be human?” Dick expands upon these in more detail, taking a very philosophical approach with his writing, almost along the lines of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. If you are looking for a challenging read that will make you puzzle and ponder the meanings of life, yet in the setting of a post-nuclear war America, this is for you.

Available now in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #: PS3554 .I3 D6 2017 In addition to this great read, the director’s cut of the Blade Runner film can be found behind the Greenfield Library circulation desk, just ask for call #: GD9 !

~ Recommended by Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist at the Greenfield Library

Staff Recommendation: The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas is heart-wrenching, thoughtful, and compelling. Starr, a high school student, is the lone witness to the shooting of one of her childhood friends, Kahlil. While dealing with the trauma of this experience, the incident gets national attention, flooding hashtags and news stations. She is caught between two worlds: her predominantly black neighborhood and her predominantly white private school. Tension from bothsides ignites, with Starr under pressure as the only one able to get Kahlil justice. This book is an absolute must read for it’s empathic perspective and political relevance.

This book is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #PZ7.1 .T448 H3 2017  

Recommended by Alyssa Winscom, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Blankets

From the author of Good-bye, Chunky Rice, winner of the 1999 Harvey Award for Best New Talent, comes a touching graphic novel aptly titled Blankets. In 2004 Blankets won three Harvey Awards for Best Artist, Best Graphic Album of Original Work, and Best Cartoonist, cementing Craig Thompson’s place in the graphic storytelling community.

In this novel, Thompson shares an autobiographical recollection of growing up and experiencing first love. We travel with Craig from childhood into adulthood, watching as our narrator learns about the world, about himself, and about what it means to actually grow up. Craig’s delivery of the story and wonderful illustrations help us to see the way that the world around us shapes who we grow to become: whether it’s discovering our talents, questioning the religions we grew up with, or finally coming to terms with the inner workings of our own selves. At times funny, heartbreaking, and incredibly joyful, Blankets is a great read for anyone interested in literature or graphic novels.

This book is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #741.50924 T372b

Recommended by Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

New database of modern popular music!

From acid house to zydeco,
from Acapulco to Zanzibar,
Bloomsbury Popular Music
provides worldwide coverage of modern popular music.

Bloomsburydownload_logo1

Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World,
is a great place to start your research on popular music, and a great place to investigate something fun for your own interests.

Looking for information on a particular album? See if one of the 120+ 33 1/3 book series has the album you are looking for!
Each volume provides in-depth analysis of an influential album or event. A great mix of music is covered, ranging from U2’s Achtung Baby, to the music from the Super Mario Brothers video game, to Miles Davis’ Bitches BrewThe new global 33 1/3 series focuses on popular music from around the world and is growing regularly.

Also growing is the expanding collection of scholarly books, with a minimum of 5 titles being added annually.
Some cool topics are covered in these books, ranging from
the history of the music video to San Francisco ‘s music scene in the 60s.

This site even has a fun timeline of popular music covering the 1960s to today!

Links to the Bloomsbury Popular Music  database are available on the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage: library.uarts.edu. Find them at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section.

UArts Library Homepage
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Rock on, UArts!

 

Jim Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

New database: The online library of pop music journalism!

RockBanner

Interested in reading up on LL Cool J or Ke$ha?

Want to listen to an audio interview with
Black Sabbath’s Tony Iommi or Ozzy Osbourne?

Curious to learn more about industrial music or Scandinavian pop?

How about an unpublished 2011 interview with the late
Chris Cornell?

Worry not: the recently added database Rock’s Backpages has that and so much more!

 

RockPick

With over 30,000 articles by music journalists collected over the last 50 years, Rock’s Backpages covers a spectrum of artists ranging from Aaliyah to ZZ Top. The site covers too many genres  of music to list here, but to give you an idea you can browse Rock’s Backpages  for genres including prog rock to rockabilly, jazz to space rock, Japanese pop to trip hop; yup, all these any more more genered are covered is this database.

 

Sure, this is a great site for finding articles for assignments, but it is also a wonderful place to browse and learn about new genres of music, classic to contemporary artists, and popular music from around the globe.

 

Links to Rock’s Backpages are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage,
library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage

 

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

 

Rock on, UArts!

James Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293