Staff Recommendation: Tin House



I recently discovered the pleasure of reading professional literary magazines. In particular, the magazine Tin House which is carried by the Greenfield Library. At a glance, the magazine’s eye catching cover illustrations stand out on the periodical shelf. The journal even includes the artist’s interpretation of the illustration at the back of the book. But mostly it is filled to the brim with beautifully crafted short stories and poems in a format that is pleasant to hold and to read.

A literary magazine is the perfect option for my attention span and life obligations when I just want to get a little creative refresher in the middle of the day. Tin House’s selection recently featured a beautiful atmospheric short story by Ursula K. Le Guin called Pity and Shame that took me right out of my obligations and into a quiet interpersonal exploration between a mine examiner and his nurse. They offer this story as well as a selection of other work on their website at http://tinhouse.com/read-the-latest/

Tin House is also a great way of staying up to date with contemporary authors and to sample works before committing. It’s a little bit like a Spotify recommended playlist: it helps to identify artists you might enjoy delving into so you can look up their album (or in this case their poetry collection) and dig in even deeper.

I recommend just a glance at this literary magazine, you can always find the latest issue at the Greenfield Library. Maybe even at one of their previous issues like Candy because much like the sweets on the cover you may find yourself delectably hooked. 

~ Recommended by Jo Dutilloy, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

Staff Recommendation: The Toaster Project: or, A Heroic Attempt to Build a Simple Electric Appliance from Scratch

Have you ever looked at a simple machine or object and figured, given the right materials, you could make one? If you have, where do you think you would even get those materials? In The Toaster Project, Thomas Thwaites sets out to make, you guessed it, a toaster, completely from scratch. This small book is divided into sections based on the materials needed and how Thwaites sets out to acquire them, from pouring a gooey potato concoction into hand-carved molds to make a kind of plastic, to digging for iron ore. There are even correspondences with different experts who charitably (and with varying levels of enthusiasm) try to help Thwaites with his seemingly ridiculous goal.

I first picked up The Toaster Project in college to pass some time. It’s a pretty short read and, in my opinion, interesting enough that you can get through it in one sitting. It’s ended up really sticking with me, and when I saw it in our collection I knew I had to pick it up again. I think what I love about it is that the book and the project are at once self-contained and expansive. There’s something satisfying about getting from one end of the book to the other, seeing the initial conception of the idea and the journey all the way to the final strange-looking, mildly-functional toaster. Thwaites set out to make something and then made it, and that’s that. But the book also brings up broader questions about industry, the environment, the human experience, and more. Where do your things really come from? How long do they take to make and how long do they last? How separated are we from the production of the things around us? And what even is a toaster?

If you’re interested in those kinds of questions, or just in design, fabrication, sculpture, industry, environmentalism, or really any number of various related topics, I suggest giving this book a try. Aside from the project itself, the writing in the book is honest, funny, and just the right amount of self-deprecating. And if you’re interested in Thwaites’ work, you should also check out another of his well known projects, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human.

Find The Toaster Project at Greenfield Library, call # NK1447.6.T49 A35 2011

~Recommended by Kait Sanchez, Music Library Circulation Assistant 

Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

Staff Recommendation: Princess Mononoke

Released in 1999 and holding a 94% audience approval rating, this Miyazaki film was hailed as “The ‘Star Wars’ of animated features!” by the New York Post. Princess Mononoke brings together the world of the spiritual and the realities of man. Similar to Pan’s Labyrinth, and Miyazaki’s later movie Spirited Away, this film exists in a world where fantasy and reality push against each other as humans seek to destroy the old ways to make way for new.

At the center of the story is a young man named Ashitaka, who makes his way to a mining village after being cursed by a dying animal god.  There he meets Lady Eboshi, whose desire to acquire more iron for the village has put her in direct conflict with the nature gods that inhabit the land nearby who are lead by Princess Mononoke, a human girl raised by the wolf god. As his curse spreads, Ashitaka seeks to find a balance between these two opposing forces before both are destroyed by their own short sightedness.

This incredible film asks the questions; ‘Can Man and Nature coexist?’ ‘Is it possible to stand in the middle of conflict, or must we choose sides?’ ‘Who is really the villain?’ ‘Is there a place for those who are different?’With beautiful animation and subtle storytelling, Hayao Miyazaki asks us to come to our own conclusions through the actions of Ashitaka, Lady Eboshi and Princess Mononoke.

You can find this DVD at the Greenfield Library, stop by the circulation desk and ask for call # GD1475

~ Recommended by Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Jazz Italian Style, from its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra

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Taking readers on a transatlantic musical journey, Jazz Italian Style explores how jazz permeated Italian culture, both through Italian immigration to the USA, and through the post-WWI introduction of jazz to the peninsula itself.  Jazz, an African-American innovation in music, evolved a distinctive Italian offshoot by the 1930s, due to the works of Italian-Americans on one side of the Atlantic as well as mostly northern Italians on the other side. Italian jazz musicians on both sides of the Atlantic would then in turn influence one another. The resulting distinctive style of jazz  became associated with Italian fascism and was even supported by Mussolini as an expression of national pride. Despite this dark co-optation, the style lives on today and is cherished by many around the world. This book will give you an appreciation for names of musicians such as Nick LaRocca and Gorni Kramer, and a unique picture of how this particular Italian style of jazz influenced the world of music.

This book is available at the UArts Music Library, call # ML3509.I85 C44 2017.

Mike Romano – Circulation Assistant, UArts Libraries

New Year, New Call Numbers!

Dear UArts Community Members,

As some of you may already know, we began a large-scale project in the Greenfield Library in the final months of the Fall 2017 semester. We reclassified every item in our collection from Dewey Decimal call numbers to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Okay, so you might be thinking, why? Well, there are a number of reasons.

  • The Library of Congress system is the standard system in the United States for academic libraries.
  •  It is already in use by the UArts Music Library and will help streamline the collections.

 It is widely regarded as a more effective system to use for classifying and finding academic materials.

You will encounter the LC system throughout your research at UArts and beyond. Even a cursory knowledge of its various sections will help you identify places in the library to browse and find materials. You can find out more about how LC call numbers are structured by taking a look at our UArts Libraries Call Number Guide on our website.In addition, we’ve created an LC subject heading guide, as well as corresponding bookmarks, available at the circulation desk:

The project included putting new labels on the books, removing every book from the shelves, and then moving the books into their new location.

From left to right: Barbara Danin, Acquisitions & Administrative Coordinator, Mary Louise Castaldi, Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian, and Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist, sorting books that were relocated to their new sections in the stacks.

Above: William Rooney, UArts Visual Resources & Special Collections Assistant, sorting books with new LC labels into their new respective aisles.

As you can see from the images taken over the holiday break, it was organized chaos with books all over the library (on tables, chairs, carts, and the floor), and staff moving in all directions!

Thanks to the participation of the entire library staff and two very capable student assistants, the project was mostly complete before the beginning of the spring semester despite the interruption of 2.5 snow days. As we continue to power through the final stages of this project, please remember that we are always here to help you navigate your way through the library. Please don’t ever hesitate to visit us or stop by the circulation desk and ask for assistance!


~The UArtsLibraries

UArts 140th #tbt Posts!

Have you checked out the University Libraries’ series of #tbt posts in honor of the University’s 140th anniversary?

You should!

Search Instagram for the hashtag #UArtsArchivesTBT, or visit:  https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/uartsarchivestbt

This is an ongoing series, so be sure to follow and check the UArts Libraries Instagram account regularly.

And boy, does this series have everything!

Students chilling on the steps of Hamilton Hall? Check.

Students sitting on the steps of Dorrance Hamilton Hall

Historic Philly shots? Check.

333 South Broad Street

Student makers making? Check.

Dance students practicing with labanotation score

Faculty engagingCheck.

Ben Eisenstat advises a student in an illustration class

Art installationsCheck.

Art installation at Hamilton Hall copy

A graduation photo from 1893!?!?! Check.

PMSIA class of 1893

Now, when you find yourself asking: where do they get all these wonderful photos?!?

Well the UArts Archives of course! All of the #tbt photos posted to Instagram -and many, many more- are available via the UArts Digital Collections page, accessible right through the good ol’ library homepage: library.uarts.edu.

The UArts Digital Collections contain not only photos from the UArts Archives, but also student work, campus event photos and videos, and other special digital collections!

Come celebrate 140home years of UArts history with us! 

Big band member and library student worker selected as a top soloist

The UArts Libraries wish to congratulate Henry Tirfe for being selected as one of five top solo artists in the College Big Band division at the 46th Next Generation Jazz Festival in Monterey, California.

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Not only is UArts School of Music student Henry Tirfe a great saxophonist, he is also a super-valued library student worker!

A junior in the UArts School of Music, Henry began working here in the Fall of 2015. He performed at the recent Next Generation Jazz Festival in California with the UArts “Z” Big Band, a finalist in the College Big Band Division.

“This was a first for me, a first for the ‘Z’ Big Band, and most importantly a first for the entire University,” said Tirfe. “I felt very proud flying back to Philadelphia bringing a trophy back for this school.”

And we are proud of him!

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Henry also pointed out the UArts Music Library has on hand some of the scores for tunes the ‘Z’ Big Band has played, such as Tiptoe and To You, composed and arranged by Thad Jones.

ToYou

Current UArts students, faculty, and staff can also listen to the tunes as originally recorded via Naxos Music Library Jazz and Music Online, respectively, available on the Audio and Video Online  library webpage.

TipToe

 

Our congratulations to director Matt Gallagher, the amazing students of the ‘Z’ Big Band, and again to outstanding soloist –and an outstanding work study student– Henry Tirfe!

UArts Libraries Work-Study Students are Honors Students

We are very pleased and proud to recognize Greenfield Library work-study students Sarah Gantt and Haylee Warner for their acceptance into the UArts Honors Program.

Our work-study students Sarah and Haylee are UArts Honors students.
Sarah Gantt (left) and Haylee Warner, UArts Libraries work-study employees and UArts Honors Program participants

Sarah is a sophomore painting major who worked in the library last year and was a great asset to our Fall 2012 Open House event, and Haylee is a freshman in the UArts School of Dance and is interested in how libraries and dance can interconnect. Sarah and Haylee happen to be excellent employees as well as excellent students. The honors program requires them to maintain a GPA of 3.75, do honors-enriched coursework, and provide community service. We think they’re up to the task.

The Libraries and Lenore Tawney

Welcome back, everyone! We hope that you’ve had a rejuvenating winter break.

As you return to campus please take a moment to view the library’s complementary display to the Lenore Tawney: Wholly Unlooked For exhibition (January 17th – March 2nd, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery). Assembled by Casey Murphy and Mary Louise Castaldi in the display cases outside the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery you will find realia, library collection highlights, and a biographical timeline created using Tawney’s fiber. The realia on display is part of a generous donation from the Lenore G. Tawney Foundation. The display is made entirely from materials and resources available in the Greenfield Library and from Tawney’s own fibers.

Included in the display are images of the Tawney sculptural installation in Hamilton Hall, Cloud Labyrinth, that was part of the National Sculpture Conference held at UArts in 1992.

Lenore Tawney

The following titles from the library’s collection are on display:

Nugent, Kathleen, ed. Lenore Tawney: A Retrospective. New York: Rizzoli, 1990. Print.

Smith, Nancy. Directions 1968. Philadelphia, PA: Philadelphia College of Art, 1968. Print.

Read this title online or download for free through our collection
on Internet Archive: http://archive.org/details/directions196800phil

Tawney, Lenore, Liesbeth Crommelin, and Kathleen N. Mangan. Lenore Tawney: Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, 11/5-30/6/1996. Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1996. Print.

WCA Honor Awards: Edna Andrade, Dorothy Dehner, Lotte Jacobi, Ellen Johnson, Stella Kramrisch, Lenore Tawney, Pecolia Warner: 5th Annual Ceremony for Outstanding Achievement in the Visual Arts. San Francisco, CA: Women’s Caucus for Art, 1983. Print.

View more of Lenore Tawney’s work in ARTstor:

 

Region of Fire- Lenore Tawney
“Region of Fire” Lenore Tawney, 1964

 

 

And from His Footprints Flowed a River- Lenore Tawney 1968
“And from His Footprints Flowed a River” Lenore Tawney, 1968

Discover primary sources and reviews through the library’s subscription databases!

The following articles are available through either EBSCOhost or Proquest:

Weltge, Sigrid Wortmann. “Spiritual Revolutionary.” American Craft 68.1 (2008): 90-97

Stein, Judith E. “The Inventive Genius Of Lenore Tawney.” Fiberarts 24.2 (1997): 28-34.

“In Memoriam: Lenore Tawney.” Fiberarts 34.4 (2008): 8.

A handout of library resources on Lenore Tawney is available at the Greenfield circulation desk.