Tag Archives: UArts Libraries

Staff Recommendation: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

 

Philip K. Dick can be regarded as one of the prominent science fiction authors of the 20th century, with many of his works posthumously inspiring film and television adaptations, such as Total Recall, Terminator, The Man in the High Castle, and Minority Report. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is one of these works, establishing the world of Ridley Scott’s groundbreaking film Blade Runner and its recent sequel, Blade Runner 2049. Like the 1982 movie, Do Androids focuses on Rick Deckhard’s search for rogue Nexus-6 androids in a futuristic, yet very bleak, California. If you are familiar with the classic Harrison Ford feature, this novel might not be what you are expecting, but it delights nonetheless. Characters like Pris, Rachael, and Roy will be recognizable to those who have seen the 1982 movie, as well as other entities that parallel elements in both films. While the films touch on themes of empathy and “What does it mean to be human?” Dick expands upon these in more detail, taking a very philosophical approach with his writing, almost along the lines of Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World. If you are looking for a challenging read that will make you puzzle and ponder the meanings of life, yet in the setting of a post-nuclear war America, this is for you.

Available now in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #: PS3554 .I3 D6 2017 In addition to this great read, the director’s cut of the Blade Runner film can be found behind the Greenfield Library circulation desk, just ask for call #: GD9 !

~ Recommended by Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist at the Greenfield Library

Staff Recommendation: The Hate U Give

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas is heart-wrenching, thoughtful, and compelling. Starr, a high school student, is the lone witness to the shooting of one of her childhood friends, Kahlil. While dealing with the trauma of this experience, the incident gets national attention, flooding hashtags and news stations. She is caught between two worlds: her predominantly black neighborhood and her predominantly white private school. Tension from bothsides ignites, with Starr under pressure as the only one able to get Kahlil justice. This book is an absolute must read for it’s empathic perspective and political relevance.

This book is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #PZ7.1 .T448 H3 2017  

Recommended by Alyssa Winscom, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: Blankets

From the author of Good-bye, Chunky Rice, winner of the 1999 Harvey Award for Best New Talent, comes a touching graphic novel aptly titled Blankets. In 2004 Blankets won three Harvey Awards for Best Artist, Best Graphic Album of Original Work, and Best Cartoonist, cementing Craig Thompson’s place in the graphic storytelling community.

In this novel, Thompson shares an autobiographical recollection of growing up and experiencing first love. We travel with Craig from childhood into adulthood, watching as our narrator learns about the world, about himself, and about what it means to actually grow up. Craig’s delivery of the story and wonderful illustrations help us to see the way that the world around us shapes who we grow to become: whether it’s discovering our talents, questioning the religions we grew up with, or finally coming to terms with the inner workings of our own selves. At times funny, heartbreaking, and incredibly joyful, Blankets is a great read for anyone interested in literature or graphic novels.

This book is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at call #741.50924 T372b

Recommended by Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

Staff Recommendation: David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations

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David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations consists of ten interviews collected over a timeline of four decades. Each of the selected conversations focus on a variety of topics outside of the realm of the musician’s technical process. The conversations also provide readers with the ability to explore the personal identity of the man behind the music. The collection begins with Bowie’s first interview at age sixteen on BBC Tonight in 1964, touching on everything from the performer’s childhood experiences on the calloused streets of South London, to his battles with substance abuse. The series concludes with his final interview in 2006, just a decade before his final album release and imminent death.

This book is a perfect quick summer read, recommended for any individual interested in David Bowie’s personal identity outside of his role as a musical performer. It is available in the Music Library new books display area at call # ML420.B754 B694 2016.

-Nichole Seedes, Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York Art World

“Institutional thinking tells us to look very, very carefully before leaping—and such thinking virtually guarantees that we’ll never leap at all. As an antidote to this, my motto has been “Act first, think later – that way you might have something to think about.” (174)

shortlifecover

In 1969, the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City hired Marcia Tucker, as their first ever woman curator. Shortly after organizing an exhibition for the post-minimalist artist Richard Tuttle, the Whitney decided to terminate her after receiving dissatisfied reviews regarding the show’s conceptually perplexing style. A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York City Art World, edited by Liza Lou, focuses on Marcia Tucker’s persistent desire to challenge the traditional norms and role of the institution through her radical approach to exhibition-making. Her memoir is adorned with personal details of the curator’s private life while simultaneously providing an insightful perspective behind Marcia Tucker’s decision to open the New Museum of Contemporary Art shortly after being fired from the Whitney.

Recommended for any individual interested in curatorial practices, museum and institutional policies, or to simply learn more about the founder of the New Museum, and her relentless desire to push the boundaries of the New York City art world.

Nichole Seedes, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

This book is accessible through our Ebsco database as an E-book, simply follow the link below, and log-in with your UArts credentials.

Academic EBook Collection Complete

Our Library Tour Winners!

Thanks to everyone who attended the UArts Libraries Open House and took library tours! This year’s winners of our drawing for $100 VISA gift cards are Hye Lee, an animation major, and Peter Lemos, a photography major. Peter toured the Greenfield Library and the Music Library, and it was his Music Library drawing slip that was his winning ticket. It pays to come to the library!

 

 

Studio Art MFA Food for Thought Lecture Series

The annual Studio Art MFA lecture series, Food for Thought, kicks off with four lectures. All lecture are free and open to the public.

Below is a selection of resources available online or from UArts Libraries on the artists lecturing this week.

Charles Long (Monday, June 25, 7pm in Hamilton Hall, CBS Auditorium)

Long is a University of the Arts alumni (BFA in Painting, 1981) and is an internationally exhibited artist with over 30 solo shows. He is represented by the Tanya Bonakdar Gallery in New York City.

Long’s work is included in Silver Star Alumni Award Exhibition from the University of the Arts, College of Art and Design (Philadelphia: The University of the Arts, 2009). Find it in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 709.22 Un384s.

Also watch the video Charles Long (Philadelphia: University of the Arts, 2006). Ask at the desk for Greenfield Library VHS call number GV822.

Check out Charles Long: More like a Dream than a Scheme curated by Vesela Sretenovic (Providence, R.I.: David Winton Bell Gallery, Brown University, 2005). Find it in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 709.24 L85d.

Charles Long, Poem of the River, 2005
Charles Long, Poem of the River, 2005

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Jeanne Quinn (Tuesday, June 26, 7pm in Terra Building, Connelly Auditorium)

Jeanne Quinn is a ceramics artist and has exhibited internationally, including Sweden and Taiwan. Read an interview with her from the American Crafts Council website.

Her work is also included in Crafting Content: Ceramic Symposium 2008 (Fayetteville, Ark.: Univ. of Arkansas, College of Arts & Sciences, 2008). Find it in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 738.0922 C842u.

Jeanne Quinn, A Thousand Tiny Deaths, 2009
Jeanne Quinn, A Thousand Tiny Deaths, 2009

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Pedro Reyes (Wednesday, June 27, 7pm in Terra Building, Connelly Auditorium)

Pedro Reyes is a Mexican sculptor and media and performance artist. His works aim to increase individual or collective agency in social, environmental or educational situations.

Read more about Reyes’ work in Rethinking Contemporary Art and Multicultural Education edited by Eungie Joo and Joseph Keehn II (New York: Routledge, 2011). Find it in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 707.1073 R314n 2011.

Harper Montgomery reviews Reyes’ Sanatorium from 2009 at the Guggenheim from Art Nexus.

Pedro Reyes, The Museum of Hypothetical Lifetimes SANATORIUM, 2011
Pedro Reyes, The Museum of Hypothetical Lifetimes SANATORIUM, 2011

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Sadia Salim (Thursday, June 28, 7pm in Terra Building, Connelly Auditorium)

Sadia Salim studied design, majoring in ceramics, at the Indus Valley School of Art and Architecture (IVS) in Karachi. She has exhibited internationally and won numerous awards.

Read about Installation in the Bluecoat Vide Art in Liverpool and about Transience from aSYNEDOCHEme.

Sadia Salim, Transience, 2009
Sadia Salim, Transience, 2009

Digital Resource of the Week: the Mucha Foundation

 

Poster for ’Gismonda’ (1894)
Poster for ’Gismonda’ (1894)

Alphonse Maria Mucha was a Czech painter in the late 1800s. He is best known for his French Art Nouveau style illustrations for theatrical posters. The Mucha Foundation was established in 1992 and is devoted to teaching and sharing his art.

The Foundation’s website is an excellent source of reading and imagery about Mucha. The Timeline section places Mucha in political and cultural contexts. The Gallery has over 300 works available for online viewing. Browse all the works or by themes. For fun, there are Color Your Own Mucha downloadable pdfs.

There is also an excellent bibliography on Mucha to help you further your research. Learn more about him at the UArts Libraries. Search for his name as a subject and as an author.  Read a biography on Oxford Art Online (you’ll be prompted to log in if you are off campus) and view images in ARTstor (you’ll be prompted to log in if you are off campus).

Digital Resource of the Week: Craft in America

Craft in America is an excellent resource for anyone interested in the history, techniques, and preservation of American arts and design. The organization is dedicated to educating students of all ages about historical and contemporary craft.

Dorothy Gill Barnes, Ella’s Mulberry Marked, 1995, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center
Dorothy Gill Barnes, Ella’s Mulberry Marked, 1995, Courtesy of Arkansas Arts Center

The website introduces contemporary artisans in all craft media: clay, wood, metal, glass, fiber, and paper/book arts. A section is dedicated to each material, linking to articles on the craftsmanship and history, as well as providing a list of craft galleries, museums, and magazines. The education section discusses craft by themes such as memory and community. The website gives access to virtual exhibitions.

The organization also produces a TV series that airs on PBS. Each episode focuses on a topic and how crafters in each material approach that topic. You can watch much of the series on PBS’ website and also get access to episodes of the show by downloading PBS’ free iPhone or iPad App. Or, borrow the first three episodes from the UArts Libraries.

Finally, check out the book Craft in America published in 2007. It’s full of beautiful color images representing all crafts, focusing on American craft communities and education. The UArts Libraries has a copy, of course!

L: Beth Lipman, Candlesticks, Books, Flowers and Fruit, 2010, Courtesy of Heller Gallery   R: Beth Lipman, After You’re Gone, 2008, Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence
L: Beth Lipman, Candlesticks, Books, Flowers and Fruit, 2010, Courtesy of Heller Gallery R: Beth Lipman, After You’re Gone, 2008, Courtesy of Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence