Tag Archives: vampires

Digital Library of the Week: Scholarly Journals about Demons and Monsters

Not all things haunted and other-worldly are considered science fiction fun. Two scholarly journals (yup, that’s peer-reviewed!) take their demonic subjects very seriously.

Nosferatu, a film by F.W. Murnau
Nosferatu, a film by F.W. Murnau

Love the greatest vampire of all, Dracula? Here’s one for you: The Journal of Dracula Studies. Yes, really, a scholarly, full-text e-journal published by the Dracula Research Center (run by Dracula scholar Elizabeth Miller). Read peer-reviewed articles such as Sharon Russell’s The Influence of Dracula on the Lesbian Vampire Film or Fear and Laughing in Sunnydale: Buffy vs Dracula by Peter Golz.

You can find even more well-researched writing on Dracula in the Greenfield Library. Search the catalog for Dracula as subject. Also search for vampire as subject and find books such as Blood Read: The Vampire as Metaphor in Contemporary Culture.

Golem by David Wisniewski
Golem by David Wisniewski

Also check out Golem: Journal of Religion and Monsters – yet another peer-reviewed, full-text e-journal with articles reflecting on how our fears and demons suggest a lot about who we are as people. Read Dana Fore’s “Oh yes. There will be blood.”: Sacrificial Power and Disability in Saw and Saw 2 or Rebecca Raphael’s The Doomsday Body, or Dr. Strangelove as Disabled Cyborg. There is even a student edition, Gremlin, that invites your articles for submission.

What is a golem, you ask? Check out Golem, an illustrated story by David Wisniewski that beautifully tells the tale of this Jewish giant. It’s available in the Greenfield Library with call number 741.641 W762g. The golem also makes a wonderful appearance in Michael Chabon’s novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. It’s also available in the Greenfield Library with call number 813 C342a.

Happy Haunted Reading!

October means it’s time for Dracula

The Rosenbach Museum and Library, one of the finest special collection libraries in the world, holds Bram Stoker’s original notes and outlines for his most famous novel, Dracula. Located at 2008-2010 Delancey Street, in a beautiful building (formerly home to the Rosenbachs) just off Rittenhouse Square, the Rosenbach’s Dracula Festival begins October 1. One of the more interesting events will be a talk by Dr. Nina Auerbach, author of Our Vampires, Ourselves, on Thursday, October 16, at 6pm. The Rosenbach does charge an admission fee: $10 for adults, $5 for students.

A still from the film "Nosferatu"
A still from the film "Nosferatu"

Want to see what the UArts Libraries have on vampires? Check out this subject search on vampires, as well as Dracula. Not enough? See what we have on horror films (from this link, click “Limit Search” and then select Material Type to limit to videos/DVDs). If you haven’t seen it yet, you MUST watch the 1922 silent film, Nosferatu, directed by F. W. Murnau. It’s a classic!