Congrats to CE Digital Photo Certificate Student Theresa Stigale

We are proud to spread the word that current Continuing Education at the University of the Arts digital photography certificate student Theresa Stigale had her images published on the popular Hidden City Philadelphia site.  Great job!

Image copyright Theresa Stigale

Her selected images were taken directly from her final project portfolio from her Night + Low Light Photography class in fall 2013 taught by CE instructor Hinda Schuman. Schuman teaches some of the most popular photography courses in CE, encouraging students to work outside and capture life around them —  and also address the technical considerations that they will face.  This spring 2014, Schuman will lead a class in Photojournalism + Documentary Photography on Tuesday nights.

Want to learn more about our Digital Photography Certificate?   Call us at 215.717.6095 or attend our  next Info Session on Wed Jan 15 — you can meet Theresa in person and hear about her successes in our program!

 

Humanitarian Photographer Tracy Clark — Free Talk on Oct 25

You are invited to:
Continuing Education Certificate Student Lecture + Discussion

The Humanitarian Photography of Tracy Clark
Thursday, October 25, 6:30 – 8 pm

The University of the Arts | Terra Hall
Connelly Auditorium | 8th Floor | 211 S. Broad Street

6:30 lecture, followed by brief reception to view her work in our Continuing Studies gallery space

2012 Digital Photography Certificate recipient and professional photographer Tracy Clark will present her work as a humanitarian photographer in Nepal, Honduras and Haiti.

Clark will present her experiences in the field and the development of her portfolio of work, as well as the importance of understanding what humanitarian aid organizations aim to do, the issues they address, and the people and populations they work with.

Clark will discuss her new book, Life Without Mirrors:  A Photographic Journey in Nepal, published in April. The book is a compilation of photographs and thought-provoking questions about her first trip to Nepal and the beginning of her passion for humanitarian photography. Clark traveled with the Pennsylvania United Medical Association (PUMA) to villages in the Lamjung District to run medical clinics and support the needs of communities in the mountain regions.

Her discussion includes the following topics:

  • Ways to get connected in humanitarian photography
  • Working with non-profits
  • Considerations for travel
  • Volunteerism vs. earning an income
  • How the Certificate Program at UArts helped Clark’s career direction

Event is free and open to the public.

RSVP to ce@uarts.edu or 215.717.6095

Photo I Students Complete Documentary Sites

The students in Rosi Dispensa‘s spring 2012 Photo I course have agreed to share the websites they built as part of the requirements of a documentary photography final course assignment.

The process involved the creation of Photoshop mock-ups to be used as guides. The students understand the importance of having a solid idea of what the design “should” look like before starting on the coding and how it can be a great help. It is important to remember that a website is not an image. A finished website is a flexible, moving thing, built with HTML or CSS. Photoshop gives us (and the client) an “expectation” of how a website will look – but not how it will behave. The students were also challenged to thinking about how their design would translate into code all the way through the design process – never forgetting- for a good designer, content drives design!

El : http://kuyael.tumblr.com

 

Susan: https://photolioness.apostrophenow.com

Eve: https://Evermiller.apostrophenow.com

 

Ron: http://web.me.com/ronmassey/www.abovetherem.com/Blog/Blog.html

 

Uta: http://meandering9.tumblr.com

 

Mary: http://akosi41.tumblr.com/

 

David: https://mrfairfax.apostrophenow.com/

Digital Photo I Students Submit End of Semester Projects

Students in Rosi Dispensa‘s CE 2708 02, Digital Photography I course, submitted their end-of-semester projects last week, and I thought I would share the results. I think you will agree, the hard work really shows!

Dan: Reading Terminal Market at Christmas time.

Sati: Steve Power’s love letter murals

Jenna: The making of Rudy the reindeer

Martina:  New York City subways

Donna: Philadelphia fashion

Mel: Portraits lit by cellphones

Patty: Italian Market, Posted in the class Flickr page

Jeffrey: Chicago in lights

Bravo to a well done group of projects, enjoy!

CE Student Success Stories | Christopher Boetticher

Many University of the Arts Continuing Education students and alums have won prestigious awards or have had their work exhibited in galleries. Other UArts CE students are building careers or have received professional recognition for their work. Whatever CE students accomplish, we love to hear about how they applied what they learned in the classroom to the real world.

In this, our second “Success Stories” posting, we look to congratulate Chris Boetticher, Web Design Dual Certificate student, who recently completed designs for the King Taco Photography website and Penn Jersey Roller Derby website, while a student in Continuing Education, Web I, Summer 2011.

Chris enrolled in the certificate program during the summer of 2010 because he wants to change careers and become a full time web designer. “I’ve been working for eleven years in various technical departments,” Chris wrote in his application statement, “but I’ve always been interested in pursuing more artistic and creative opportunities.”

I invite you to watch Chris’s video and learn a bit about his design process. Also, visit the site he created as these screen captures do little to convey the impact of his design aesthetic. I think you will agree, Chris is a talented designer whom clients will want to hire.

Do you have a UArts Continuing Education Success Story to tell? Email us at creativeconsumptionpost@gmail.com and let us know!

Tell Us How You Create Your Now – Participate In the Student Success Stories Project

Many UArts Continuing Education students and alums have won prestigious awards or have had their work exhibited in galleries. Other UArts CE students are building careers, or have received professional recognition for their work.

We thought we would begin formally chronicling and rewarding these achievements.

Our exciting and ambitious student success stories project is moving from development to production. Whether you are a current student, or an alumnus, you can get involved in the process of creating a video documenting your success story. We’re asking any of our students (current and former) and certificate grads who are interested in participating, to create a short (30-second to 2- minute) video of themselves talking about and/or demonstrating how they use their skills and talents, and how Continuing Education at UArts has helped them.

Looking for inspiration and some ideas from fellow students? Read last week’s posting about Kaytee Riek and consider making a video of your own.

Do you have a UArts CE Success Story to tell? Email us at creativeconsumptionpost@gmail.com and let us know!

CE Student Success Stories | Kaytee Riek

Many University of the Arts Continuing Education students and alums have won prestigious awards or have had their work exhibited in galleries. Other UArts CE students are building careers or have received professional recognition for their work. Whatever CE students accomplish, we love to hear about how they applied what they learned in the classroom to the real world.

In this inaugural Success Stories posting, we look to congratulate Kaytee Riek, Communications + Web Design Dual Certificate student, who recently completed a redesign of the Act Up Philadelphia website while a student in Web I.

Kaytee enrolled in the certificate program during the fall of 2010 because she thought it was time she learn the foundations for skills she was already using in her professional and personal life. “For several years,” Kaytee wrote in her application statement, “I’ve done print design work for various non-profit and activist organizations. I have developed websites for a number of organizations. But I do not have any formal training and I’ve reached a cap on what I can teach myself. It’s time for me to learn from professionals about how to design for print and the web.”

I invite you to watch Kaytee’s video and learn a bit about her design process. Also, visit the site she created for Act Up Philadelphia as these screen captures do little to convey the impact of Kaytee’s design aesthetic. I think you will agree, Kaytee is a talented designer whom clients will want to hire.

You can view Kaytee’s video by visiting the CE Vimeo page.

Do you have a UArts Continuing Education Success Story to tell? Email us at creativeconsumptionpost@gmail.com and let us know!

Web I Students Complete Site Mock-Ups

King Taco Photography_Christopher Boetticher designer

The students in Mia Rosenthal’s summer Web I course have agreed to share the websites they built using HTML + CSS. The process involved the creation of Photoshop mock-ups to be used as guides. The students understand the importance of having a solid idea of what the design ‘should’ look like before starting on the coding and how it can be a great help. It is important to remember that a website is not an image. A finished website is a flexible, moving thing, built with HTML or CSS. Photoshop gives us (and the client) an ‘expectation’ of how a website will look- but not how it will behave. The students were also challenged to thinking about how their design would translate into code all the way through the design process– never forgetting- for a good designer, content drives design!

Act Up Philadelphia_Kaytee Riek designer

Students were reminded to keep the three fundamental design principles- Layout, Type + Color, in mind, when developing their sites.

Layout

Layout is without a doubt the most important part of the process. You could have the most beautifully selected fonts, perfect colors, and delicious little details, but without a solid layout, the whole design falls flat. Fortunately, building a solid, float-based layout with CSS is one of the easiest things you can do as a web designer. A List Apart has a Great Article on the subject that is highly recommend for the technical details of building a CSS-based layout. If there’s one thing you should already know before going into your code editor, it’s the layout of your design. If you have a specific layout in mind, it’s a simple matter to code it up. However, if you go in without a layout in mind, you’ll be disappointed at the results. Layout isn’t a thing you can just experiment and switch out on the fly, it’s a matter that requires careful consideration from the designer.

One of the great things about “Responsive Web Design” is how it encourages designers to think in proportions, rather than pixels. For instance, you could say that this element needs to be 30% of the main container, as opposed to 200px or a similar measurement. This especially comes in handy for in-browser web design when one has to structure a page. You could start off with a main container element that is, say, 70% of the browser window, and then design the rest of the page inside that container in proportion to that element’s width. No more messing about with exact pixel measurements and that stupid Ruler Tool in Photoshop!

Ajar_Tori McNally designer

Type
At this point, you should all have at least heard of @font-face, even if you haven’t used it in a project yet. @font-face is a way of embedding and using any typeface for use on a website, even if it is not installed on your users’ computers. This simple idea has brought a whole new era of web typography in a matter of a few years. Entire businesses like Typekit and Fontdeck have cropped up for the sole purpose of serving up beautiful typefaces for your website.  It’s a lot easier to manage typefaces when they are managed by CSS rules, not Photoshop. I highly recommend using Typekit, as many more fonts are available there than with a standard @font-face license. You can always manage the code yourself, but dealing with licences and having to purchase each font individually gets pretty ridiculous pretty fast.

Door_Kate Stevenson designer

Color

In a “traditional” web design process, often the designer starts by constructing a grayscale mockup of their design in Photoshop, before adding the colors and details needed to make the design pop. This process is integral to the layout and overall feel of the design. Even if you don’t use black and white, constructing your design in sets of boxes and simple shapes really lets you see how your design will work from a higher perspective. The building of a design using simple boxes is really easily converted to our in-browser workflow. Just use <div>’s with basic CSS applied to them. Once you have your layout and typography marked up and styled properly, introducing color becomes a trivial matter with a few lines of code. This isn’t to say that choosing the colors is an easy and simple technique (although there is a great article for that too), just that coloring the objects on a technical level is very simple. Even displaying beautiful gradients is easy with CSS3.

Toro_Emilia Apostolova designer

Interview: Maria Jose Silva- Print Design Certificate Student

1. What were your expectations of the certificate program and how did you first hear about it?

When I arrived to Philadelphia two years ago, I wanted to study graphic design. I researched all the art schools in the area and decided to continue my education at UArts because the certificate program would be the most useful for my goal of starting my own design agency.

2. What was your education in design before enrolling in the certificate program?

My undergrad studies were in graphic design in Chile, so when I started the program at UArts not only did I had a few years of experience, I had some academic experience also.

3. How has your design sensibility been shaped by your experience in the program?

Thanks to my professors and classmates I am always stimulated to see design from a perspective different from the one that I had before attending UArts.

4. What was your experience like working with the faculty? Was there anyone you think deserves special mention?

I find the UArts faculty to be of the highest level. Not only in their preparation, experience and credentials, but also the way they teach. One professor that has really stood out during my time in the certificate program is Joe DeCerchio. I took Joe’s typography class in the spring of 2010.  I consider typography a very tough topic to teach. However, Joe is very motivating and he made each session dynamic. Weekly deliverables kept me motivated during the entire term. Moreover, Joe was always willing to help me whenever I had any doubts about a project I was working on.

5. What were some of the things that you knew you were good at it going in, and some of the things that you definitely wanted to improve on?

When I started the program, I knew that I was lacking the knowledge of some of the newest graphic design software. Now that I am finishing, I am really prepared to go back into the design market with the top of the line skills I need.

6. What’s the next step for you?

After graduation my plans is to go back to Chile and start my own graphic design agency.

7. How do you find your inspiration?

I always try to place myself in my client´s shoes. This helps me to understand the dilemma they are faced with and that I am going to solve through my design.

8. What do you know now that you wish you had known before pursing your graphic design education?

Something that has surprised me in my career is that people, in general, don’t give graphic design the respect it deserves. Sometimes, they don’t understand the role graphic design plays in the way a message is communicated and just how important the message is in itself. One of my tasks as a graphic designer is to convince other people that communication and graphic design together is a truly powerful tool to generate impact and persuade.