Studio Art MFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Michael O’Malley

Michael O’Malley is a sculptor who, in his own words, “investigates the ‘nature’ of architecture and its everyday objects.”

“Michael O’Malley: CherrydeLosReyes” by Christopher Miles in Artforum International, v. 42, no. 8 (April 2004) reviews O’Malley’s exhibition at CherrydeLosReyes in Los Angeles, suggesting that the work hints at “the metaphysical, the social, and the erotic.” This article abstract was found using WilsonWeb (if  you are off campus, you will have to login to these databases first) and is available in print in Greenfield Library. You can also read it online at Find Articles.

“Michael O’Malley: Southern Exposure, San Francisco”  by Maria Porges in Artforum International, v. 39, no. 1 (September 2000) reviews O’Malley’s installation Top Heavy, a maze of plaster and wire that vaguely resembles a human body. This article abstract was found using WilsonWeb (if  you are off campus, you will have to login to these databases first) and is available in print in Greenfield Library. You can also read it online at Find Articles.

O’Malley will discuss his work this Wednesday, June 22 at 1 pm in Hamilton Hall’s CBS Auditorium.

Detail of Habitat, 2007
Detail of Habitat, 2007

Contemporary Literary Criticism Select

Contemporary Literary Criticism Select (CLCS) is a collection of published scholarly criticism about the works of major modern authors including novelists, poets, and playwrights. This is a great place to start your research on most contemporary authors.

CLCS can be searched by author, title of the work, or even themes such as screenplays (you’ll find Quentin Tarantino and Francis Ford Coppola here), musicals (David Mamet and Arthur Miller are included), and essays (JRR Tolkien is here along with Ayn Rand). Each entry contains biographical information on the author, a list of major works by the author, additional resources for further study, and critical essays. If available, interviews with the author (a primary source!) are also included.

To access CLCS from the UArts Libraries’ homepage, under Online Resources click on Articles. You’ll find CLCS and have 24/7 access (if you are off campus you’ll need to login with your UArts username and password) to scholarly sources for all your research needs.

Library staff recommendation: Tales of Hoffmann

Tales of Hoffmann
by E.T.A Hoffmann, illustrated by Mario Laboccetta
741.641 L113 Greenfield Open Stacks

I chose this particular copy of Hoffmann’s work not only for the illustrations which accompany the text but because the book itself is so beautiful. There is something truly wonderful about the lives of books. This book was given as a Christmas gift in 1932 and has, along its journey, come to be a part of our collection. Perhaps it was a gift to the library from the recipient to whom it is addressed or perhaps it went through a series of owners before it came to rest at the Greenfield Library. I like to think that many years from now, when someone else may own my books, maybe my own inscriptions will please them as much as it pleases me now to find things written along the title page or front cover. In addition to its aesthetic beauty, E.T.A Hoffmann’s The Sandman is one of my favorite short stories!

See also:

The Tales of Hoffmann
Newly selected and translated from the German by Michael Bullock.
833 H67ta Greenfield Open Stacks

E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Musical Aesthetics by Abigail Chantler.
ML410 .H699C4 2006 Music Library Open Stacks

Coppelia, performed by Ballets de San Juan
GD786 Greenfield DVD

Recommended by Casey Murphy.

Casey Murphy

Studio Art MFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Roberta Fallon and Libby Rosof

Ms. Fallon and Ms. Rosof are well-known for their blog, the artblog, started in April 2003. Multiple award winners, they each have an honorary doctorate in fine arts from Moore College of Art (2008). Not only are they active and informative art bloggers, they are both artists. Here are some resources on the pair, available to you through the UArts Libraries:

“Report from the Blogosphere: The New Grass Roots” from Art in America, v.59, no.10 (November 2007) reviews a panel discussion about art blogging and its contributions. Ms. Fallon and Ms. Rosof both participated in the conversation. This article abstract was found using WilsonWeb (if  you are off campus, you will have to login to these databases first) and is available in print in Greenfield Library.

Roberta Fallon discusses the lively art scene in the city in “Philadelphia: The City According to Art” from Art Review (London), no. 3 (September 2006). She focuses on how young artists are leaving New York and heading south to Philadelphia to become leaders in cutting-edge media and contemporary art. A guide to venues in the city is included. The full text of this article is available in WilsonWeb.

“Come and Get It: Pair Hand Out Free Art; Out of the Galleries, Onto the Street” by Eils Lotozo for The Philadelphia Inquirer (March 10, 2005) looks at Ms. Fallon and Ms. Rosof as artists, rather than as bloggers. The full text of this article is available in LexisNexis.

Libby Rosof and Roberta Fallon (read more at Artjaw.com)
Libby Rosof and Roberta Fallon (read more at Artjaw.com)

Digital Resource of the Week: CLAROS

Head of Youth, 440 BC, from Beazley Archive from Beazley Archive
Head of Youth, 440 BC, from Beazley Archive

CLAROS (CLassical Art Research Online Services) brings together the collections of universities and museums to provide a database of scholarly research on classical antiquity. You’ll find ceramics (both western and eastern), sculpture, bronze, eastern painting (western will be available soon!), and architectural photographs. You can further limit by location and time period.

Each image links you to the university collection or museum that owns the item. You’ll find material and technical details for the artwork, plus gateways to similar items in the collection. Another way to limit your search is by using a subpage of CLAROS called CLAROS Data. Here you can search from a list of object type or personality.

Bookmark this site to help you with your art history courses!

Set of four tiles with tulips, prunus sprays and serrated leaves Turkey, 2nd half of the 16th century
Set of four tiles with tulips, prunus sprays and serrated leaves Turkey, 2nd half of the 16th century