Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

Staff Recommendation: Princess Mononoke

Released in 1999 and holding a 94% audience approval rating, this Miyazaki film was hailed as “The ‘Star Wars’ of animated features!” by the New York Post. Princess Mononoke brings together the world of the spiritual and the realities of man. Similar to Pan’s Labyrinth, and Miyazaki’s later movie Spirited Away, this film exists in a world where fantasy and reality push against each other as humans seek to destroy the old ways to make way for new.

At the center of the story is a young man named Ashitaka, who makes his way to a mining village after being cursed by a dying animal god.  There he meets Lady Eboshi, whose desire to acquire more iron for the village has put her in direct conflict with the nature gods that inhabit the land nearby who are lead by Princess Mononoke, a human girl raised by the wolf god. As his curse spreads, Ashitaka seeks to find a balance between these two opposing forces before both are destroyed by their own short sightedness.

This incredible film asks the questions; ‘Can Man and Nature coexist?’ ‘Is it possible to stand in the middle of conflict, or must we choose sides?’ ‘Who is really the villain?’ ‘Is there a place for those who are different?’With beautiful animation and subtle storytelling, Hayao Miyazaki asks us to come to our own conclusions through the actions of Ashitaka, Lady Eboshi and Princess Mononoke.

You can find this DVD at the Greenfield Library, stop by the circulation desk and ask for call # GD1475

~ Recommended by Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant

New Year, New Call Numbers!

Dear UArts Community Members,

As some of you may already know, we began a large-scale project in the Greenfield Library in the final months of the Fall 2017 semester. We reclassified every item in our collection from Dewey Decimal call numbers to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Okay, so you might be thinking, why? Well, there are a number of reasons.

  • The Library of Congress system is the standard system in the United States for academic libraries.
  •  It is already in use by the UArts Music Library and will help streamline the collections.

 It is widely regarded as a more effective system to use for classifying and finding academic materials.

You will encounter the LC system throughout your research at UArts and beyond. Even a cursory knowledge of its various sections will help you identify places in the library to browse and find materials. You can find out more about how LC call numbers are structured by taking a look at our UArts Libraries Call Number Guide on our website.In addition, we’ve created an LC subject heading guide, as well as corresponding bookmarks, available at the circulation desk:

The project included putting new labels on the books, removing every book from the shelves, and then moving the books into their new location.

From left to right: Barbara Danin, Acquisitions & Administrative Coordinator, Mary Louise Castaldi, Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian, and Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist, sorting books that were relocated to their new sections in the stacks.

Above: William Rooney, UArts Visual Resources & Special Collections Assistant, sorting books with new LC labels into their new respective aisles.

As you can see from the images taken over the holiday break, it was organized chaos with books all over the library (on tables, chairs, carts, and the floor), and staff moving in all directions!

Thanks to the participation of the entire library staff and two very capable student assistants, the project was mostly complete before the beginning of the spring semester despite the interruption of 2.5 snow days. As we continue to power through the final stages of this project, please remember that we are always here to help you navigate your way through the library. Please don’t ever hesitate to visit us or stop by the circulation desk and ask for assistance!


~The UArtsLibraries

Staff Recommendation: David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations

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David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations consists of ten interviews collected over a timeline of four decades. Each of the selected conversations focus on a variety of topics outside of the realm of the musician’s technical process. The conversations also provide readers with the ability to explore the personal identity of the man behind the music. The collection begins with Bowie’s first interview at age sixteen on BBC Tonight in 1964, touching on everything from the performer’s childhood experiences on the calloused streets of South London, to his battles with substance abuse. The series concludes with his final interview in 2006, just a decade before his final album release and imminent death.

This book is a perfect quick summer read, recommended for any individual interested in David Bowie’s personal identity outside of his role as a musical performer. It is available in the Music Library new books display area at call # ML420.B754 B694 2016.

-Nichole Seedes, Circulation Assistant

Staff Recommendation – A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York Art World

“Institutional thinking tells us to look very, very carefully before leaping—and such thinking virtually guarantees that we’ll never leap at all. As an antidote to this, my motto has been “Act first, think later – that way you might have something to think about.” (174)

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In 1969, the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City hired Marcia Tucker, as their first ever woman curator. Shortly after organizing an exhibition for the post-minimalist artist Richard Tuttle, the Whitney decided to terminate her after receiving dissatisfied reviews regarding the show’s conceptually perplexing style. A Short Life of Trouble: Forty Years in the New York City Art World, edited by Liza Lou, focuses on Marcia Tucker’s persistent desire to challenge the traditional norms and role of the institution through her radical approach to exhibition-making. Her memoir is adorned with personal details of the curator’s private life while simultaneously providing an insightful perspective behind Marcia Tucker’s decision to open the New Museum of Contemporary Art shortly after being fired from the Whitney.

Recommended for any individual interested in curatorial practices, museum and institutional policies, or to simply learn more about the founder of the New Museum, and her relentless desire to push the boundaries of the New York City art world.

This book is accessible through our Ebsco database as an E-book, simply follow the link below, and log-in with your UArts credentials.

Academic EBook Collection Complete

Nichole Seedes, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant