Digital Resource of the Week: International Music Scores Library Project

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The International Music Scores Library Project (IMSLP) aims to catalog all the free, public domain music scores available online in one simple, searchable interface. The Project was started in 2006 by Edward Guo, a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston and currently a doctoral student at Harvard Law School.

IMSLP, commonly called the Petrucci Library after the Italian sheet music printer Ottaviano Petrucci, has over 210,000 scores and 20,000 recordings. The Library is a wiki searchable by composer, nationality,  genre, and more. But the Library is more than a collection of music: the IMSLP Journal and Forums are digital meeting places for musicians and music lovers to share ideas and collaborate on projects.

IMSLP works hard to follow all copyright regulations, as The New York Times reported last year, though this is difficult given that different countries have different rules. Volunteers help check for copyright violations. Considering signing up to become an IMSLP contributor yourself and help keep the project going!

Studio Art MFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Paulina Kolczynska

Curator Paulina Kolczynska will speak Friday, August 3 at 7pm in Terra, Connelly Lecture Hall.

Kolczynska is an art historian and freelance curator. She has organized exhibitions at the Edinburgh Film House and the Edinburgh City Art Center. She has also worked as a reporter for the Polish section of the BBC in London (radio). She now works for the Art Dealers Association of America in New York.

Read Kolczynska’s essay, “Miroslaw Balka with Anda Rottenberg and Anna Kamachora at the Polish Pavilion” in New Art from Eastern Europe: Identity and Conflict (London: Academy Editions; Deerfield Beech, Fla.: VCH Publishers [distributor], c1994). It’s available in the Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 709.4309045 N42a.

Also read her essay “Bread and Circuses” in Performance Art: Into the 90s (London: Academy Editions; New York: Distributed by St. Martin’s Press, c1994). It’s available in the Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 700.922 P416a.

 

 

Digital Resources of the Week: The National Trust Library Historic Postcards

Postcards have always been a popular souvenir and a fun way to send a quick message home while on vacation. Often depicting famous buildings or landscapes, The National Trust Library Historic Postcard Collection suggests that “these postcards also provide unique evidence of the evolution in American architecture, with rare glimpses of buildings or places that may no longer exist or have dramatically altered over time.”

The National Trust Historic Postcard Collection has over 20,000 postcards. The University of Maryland’s University Libraries’ Digital Collections provides images of many of these postcards. Browse by state (there are 830 postcards depicting aspects of Pennsylvania) or enter a keyword search such as Philadelphia, ocean, or flower.

 

Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida, circa 1908
Biscayne Bay in Miami, Florida, circa 1908

Want to see more postcards? Search the UArts Libraries’ catalog for the subject postcards. We have many beautiful books including one about Philadelphia postcards from the early 1900s. Happy travels this summer!

 

Philadelphia's City Hall, circa 1901-1907
Philadelphia's City Hall, circa 1901-1907

Studio Art MFA Food for Thought Lecture Series: Amira Hanafi

Amira Hanafi will lecture Wednesday, July 25th at 7:00 pm in Hamilton Hall, CBS Auditorium.

Hanafi is an internationally exhibited artist,  published writer, and curator. She grew up in America, earning her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, but returned to Egypt in 2010 where she started collaborating with the Artellewa Art Space in Giza, Egypt.

Read a lengthy interview with Hanafi by Caroline Picard – How to Get Lost in a City at Bad at Sports Contemporary Art Talk and How to Get Lost in a Text at Lantern Daily.

Watch Hanafi’s spoken word video Trinities on Vimeo. Learn more about her books Forgery and Minced English.

from Hanafi's Testimony
from Hanafi's Testimony