Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

New theater database!

Want to go “behind the scenes” of theater productions from around the world? Well, then, let us introduce you to a new database provided by the University Libraries: Performance Design Archive Online!

From the 17th century through to the present day, Performance Design Archive Online covers so many aspects of theater production design,  including scenic and set design, lighting design, sound design, costume design,  and makeup.

This database contains a range of materials from books and periodicals, to archival materials and instructional videos, and from sketches & technical drawings, to models and more.

Check out this list of genres/performance types covered:

Want to explore this list?
Visit library.uarts.edu and under “Online Resources” a link to Performance Design Archive Online is available via either the  Reference Sources or All Databases, A-Z pages. 

 For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.

 

Once into Performance Design Archive Online you can browse by genre to get the list above, in addition to five other browse options:

(click on the image above to enlarge)

And of course there is a search option to search out your favorite show or designer, as well as options to limit by area of design, content type,  genre, date, and more.

If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me – your library liaison to the Brind School of Theater Arts. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Jim Cowen
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

 

Lynda.com – Tutorials for Everything

Lynda.com is a fantastic website and resource for technology training. University of the Arts’ subscription to the site allows you to access tutorials for a wide range of subjects. On it there are hundreds of online courses that can help you to learn Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Excel, etc., as well as management and presentation skills. The service is connected to LinkedIn and allows you to add skills to your professional profile. You can use this service to seriously beef up your resume and collect a number of work-related skills. You can also choose to follow more general learning paths like “Become a Content Marketer” or “Become a Project Coordinator”.
Learn everything from graphic design to coding through this service made free through University of the Arts’ subscription. Maybe even use it to knock out a New Year’s resolution or two.

One note: The first time you log into Lynda, you have to go through the UArts portal to register. After doing that once and setting up a Lynda account, you can access it directly, including on its mobile app!

Post by Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

A/V Equipment

Have you ever found yourself on campus with a paper due tomorrow, 5% battery, and your laptop charger forgotten at home? Don’t worry, UArts Libraries have your back! From laptop chargers to headphones, you can check these out at the circulation desks to use in the library:

Greenfield Library

Photo on 3-2-16 at 8.45 AM

 

 

 

 

  • Macbook chargers (Magsafe 1 & 2)
  • iPhone chargers
  • Micro USB cords (for Android & other phones)
  • Headphones
  • Noise-cancelling headphones
  • Ethernet cords
  • DVD USB drive
  • iPad

Photo on 3-2-16 at 8.48 AM copy

Music Library

  • Macbook chargers (Magsafe 1 & 2)
  • iPods
  • iPad
  • iPhone chargers
  • Micro USB cords (for Android & other phones)
  • Headphones
  • Noise-cancelling headphones
  • Ethernet cords

Phone Jim Sad Phone Charge Jim

We’re trying something new this semester!

The Libraries are test driving something new this semester: OneSearch, which lets you search for articles from the databases, books on the shelves, videos, images, and much more all in one place.

When you visit the Libraries’ website, you will find a OneSearch box where the library catalog usually is. (If you want the traditional catalog, it’s still there in the tab to the left.) 

eds

This is a trial service — we will decide whether to make it a permanent addition at the end of the semester. Your feedback is crucial to this decision! Does it make it easier to find items you need? Harder? How is it working for you? Please send all comments to Josh Roberts, joroberts@uarts.edu. 

OneSearch is not replacing any of our existing resources or services. It is intended to make it easier to find what we already have. We hope it does!

 
Nitty-Gritty Details

OneSearch uses the Ebsco Discovery Service (EDS) product, so you’ll notice that it looks a lot like the regular Ebscohost article database. If you have signed up for a personal Ebscohost account to save and organize your research, you can even use it from OneSearch.

OneSearch contains indexing for all our Ebsco databases, as well as many other sources: journals and ebooks that are held in other databases, such as ProQuest or JSTOR; books, DVDs, scores, and other items physically located in the libraries; open access scholarly journals available on the web; streaming audio and video from Kanopy, Alexander Street Press, and Naxos; and images from ArtStor. 

This indexing is not 100% complete for non-Ebsco sources, but it’s pretty close. So OneSearch is not the only source you should consult if you are doing very in-depth research, like a review of literature for your thesis, but it should be a good place to start, especially for more general research needs. 

OneSearch has many features that we hope will make it easier to use than our existing databases. These include “research starters” that can give you a little background on thousands of topics. It also has smarter search logic, which will expand your search in some of the intuitive ways you are used to from Google. For example if you search for “free speech” and “colleges”, One Search will also include terms like “universities” and “higher education.” You don’t even need to enter the last name first when searching for a specific author. 

Our access to EDS is currently on a trial basis. As such, it is not as fully functional as it will be if we commit to adding it permanently. Links to other databases may occasionally be inconsistent, and our e-journal holdings information may have a few gaps, but these should improve with time. Please send any issues you encounter to Josh Roberts, joroberts@uarts.edu.