New database: QWEST TV

QWEST TV:
Journey into jazz and beyond

The UArts Libraries is happy to announce we are an institutional beta subscriber to Qwest TV, featuring streaming video of concerts and more!

I’ll get this right out of the way: as a beta subscriber access is currently available on-campus only. As soon as they get everything set up, it will indeed be available for off-campus use by current UArts students, faculty, and staff.

To access Qwest TV: just click this link from on-campus and you should go right in. You’ll know it worked when you see the UArts icon in the top right. As this is a new, beta subscription, please don’t hesitate to let me know if you have any problems.

You can always find Qwest TV by visiting library.uarts.edu and clicking the link “Audio/Video Online” in the Online Resources section.

What is qwest TV?

Qwest TV, co-founded by Quincy Jones and Reza Ackbaraly, was launched for individual subscriptions in December of 2017. As soon as institutional access became available, we signed up! The growing collection has 300+ streaming videos, including full-length concerts, documentaries, and archival footage. This resource houses exclusives and original programming, and is growing fast! Principally focused around jazz, you will also discover some pop music, world music, and more.

In the mood for a Count Basie performance? Check out their archives! Thelonious Monk? Yes! Ella Fitzgerald? Yes! Art Ensemble of Chicago? Ertha Kitt? Maceo Parker? Yes, yes, yes! All these musicians and more are represented.

Feel like watching Sun Ra at Estival Jazz ’85? Well you can. Are you feeling more contemporary? Check out London’s Morcheeba play a sold-out show at Jazz à Vienne in Vienna last year. Maybe stream the Charles Lloyd Quartet circa 2011, or check in on bassist Omer Avital at the 2013 Nice Jazz Festival.

A documentary on the Indian music of Benares? They have you covered. Docs on Ornette Coleman? Chick Corea? Blue Note? Check, check, check.

There is just far too much to list, so check out this site as soon as you have a minute and explore the wealth of amazing content!

And Qwest TV isn’t “just” streaming video. Explore articles, interviews, news updates, album reviews, and more. Again you can check all of this out by visiting this link from on-campus, or the Audio/Video Online page listed in the Online Resources section of our website, library.uarts.edu. One you see that UArts logo, you know you are ready to stream!

If you have any questions about this or other UArts Libraries resources, just ask me:


Jim Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

Staff Recommendation: Sabrina by Nick Drnaso

“Remember Drew Peterson? That cop that killed his wives? It was a big news story in 2007. I was dating Emma that summer. We used to sit in her mom’s basement and watch movies all night. We were watching a TV special about Drew Peterson one night when we leaned in and kissed each other for the first time. Now whenever I see or hear anything about Drew Peterson, I feel like I’m eighteen in Emma’s basement again. Is it weird to feel nostalgic for stuff like that?”

New to the library: Sabrina is a graphic novel written and illustrated by Nick Drnaso, published in 2018. It is the first ever graphic novel to be longlisted for The Man Booker Prize. Deep and introspective with minimalistic illustrations, Drnaso tells the story of a young woman kidnapped in Chicago, and how the events that unfold from this affect everyone connected to her. At the same time, it is also a poignant commentary on the fast-paced dissemination of information in our digital age, how this numbs us to the continuous stories of violence bombarding us on our screens, and the confusion we feel in a “fake news” world. The above quote, spoken by character Calvin Wrobel, is a perfect example of this sense of disassociation. Instead of remembering the Drew Peterson case as a horrific event where women went missing and were found murdered, Wrobel only remembers kissing his girlfriend at the time, because the television story was simply background noise. Drnaso does a beautiful job reminding us that moments of tragedy and horror aren’t background noise, and that we need to realize there are individuals behind every story.

If you’d like to check out Sabrina, it is available in the Greenfield Library, call number PN6727 .D76 S25 2018.

Recommended by Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist

New Script Database

The UArts Libraries has signed up for a database we hope you all will enjoy: 
New Play Exchange is “the world’s largest digital library of scripts by living writers. Designed and built with the needs of the entire new play sector in mind, the New Play Exchange serves writers, producers, directors, artistic directors, literary managers, dramaturgs, publishers, agents, actors, professors, students, and even fans of the theater.”
 
To access this resource, visit the Online Resources portion of our homepage, library.uarts.edu, click the link to E-books, and scroll down to the second to last option where you’ll find New Play Exchange
 
If you are on the campus network, you will be taken directly into the database. From off-campus, simply enter your UArts credentials and you’ll be able to gain access. 
 
You can search this resource by play, people, or organizations: 
 
 
The options by which you can limit your search results are awesome! Though too numerous to list here, some limiting options include by age, genre, gender, sexual identity, race, ethnic identity, and more. 
 
Results will include abstracts for plays, as well as full text plays. To limit results to only full text scripts, click the Full scripts available for download option under the Script Availability limiter on the right hand side: 
 
 
When you find a script in full text you like, you can quickly download it:
Please note: our institutional license does not include the option to create reading lists, but as I just mentioned you can just download the ones you like, or even save the website URLs to visit them again later.
 
Questions?
 
Don’t hesitate to contact me, Jim Cowen, your library liaison to the Brind School of Theater Arts! 
 
Enjoy!

Staff Recommendation: Parable of the Sower

Butler, Octavia E. Parable of the Sower.

Greenfield Open Stacks PS3552 .U827 P37 2016

Science fiction makes us aware of our sight’s present limitations, highlighting the gap between what is and what could be. Octavia E. Butler’s sci-fi centers around survival as a result of dark radical shifts in future society. Parable of the Sower, published in 1993 but set in 2020s America, forces reflection onto its readers—especially when read in 2018.

The book is composed of journal entries by protagonist Lauren Olamina, a teenager born with hyperempathy, sharing the physical pain of others she witnesses. The world around Lauren is collapsing due to corporate greed, climate change, racism, hostile police presence, gun violence, and walls. Following the brutal loss of her family and neighborhood, she is forced to navigate an altered world on her own in an attempt to walk north from California with no true destination, excruciatingly hindered by her hyperempathy.

Lauren’s beam of hope in this dystopia is her development of a new belief system called “Earthseed.” Its ultimate mantra is to accept Change in order to grow—the idea that Change is the lasting truth no matter how extreme. “God is Change; Embrace diversity or be destroyed.”

Butler wrote the ideas behind Earthseed out of the American fear of the unknown, and the potential for history to repeat itself over time. As a Black writer in a world that washes over people of color and racial politics in sci-fi, Butler’s books embed race into the narrative, just as it is embedded into reality. Parable of the Sower makes us reconsider the current state of our country, placing us in a state of anxiety alongside an acceptance to move forward with empathy and power.

I absolutely recommend picking up and checking out this book at the Greenfield Library Open Stacks (call # PS3552 .U827 .P37 2016.) There is also a graphic novel adaptation of Butler’s awesome book Kindred, which can be found as an eBook through EBSCOHost. Happy reading and reflecting!

~ Recommended by Victoria Schenck, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

Student Recommendation: Cop Rock

Cop Rock: The Complete Series

Music Library MD962

Cop Rock, a true gift from the 90s. Steven Bochco and William M. Finkelstein have created a gritty police drama that also happens to be an American musical.

To give you an idea, the pilot opens with the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) bursting into a home during a drug raid. Once all suspects have been apprehended and are being put into handcuffs, a beat drops and the ensemble of suspects break into a song expressing to the LAPD the amount of power they hold on the streets.

Being a product of its time, Cop Rock is very self-aware of tensions around police brutality, racial profiling, and analyzing the line of right and wrong. It touches on issues and conversations that we are still having to this day. Thematically, the show is a true drama, but the absurdism seeps in through the songs leading Cop Rock to float closer to a dark comedy. The pilot episode gives us a courtroom scene where the jury breaks into a gospel number to deliver their verdict.

In 2002 TV Guide ranked this show as #8 on their list of “50 Worst TV Shows of All Time”. After 11 episodes ABC canceled the show due to its critical and commercial failure. Cop Rock is infamous for being one of TV’s biggest failures in the 90s, but, thanks to a faculty request, we have it at UArts, ready to be checked out of the Music Library.

Cop Rock is a true gem in my book.  If you’re into films such as The Room, or Rocky Horror Picture Show, then Cop Rock is for you. Find it in the UArts Music Library, call # MD962.

~ Recommended by Briana Gause, UArts Music Library Work Study Assistant