New theater database!

Want to go “behind the scenes” of theater productions from around the world? Well, then, let us introduce you to a new database provided by the University Libraries: Performance Design Archive Online!

From the 17th century through to the present day, Performance Design Archive Online covers so many aspects of theater production design,  including scenic and set design, lighting design, sound design, costume design,  and makeup.

This database contains a range of materials from books and periodicals, to archival materials and instructional videos, and from sketches & technical drawings, to models and more.

Check out this list of genres/performance types covered:

Want to explore this list?
Visit library.uarts.edu and under “Online Resources” a link to Performance Design Archive Online is available via either the  Reference Sources or All Databases, A-Z pages. 

 For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.

 

Once into Performance Design Archive Online you can browse by genre to get the list above, in addition to five other browse options:

(click on the image above to enlarge)

And of course there is a search option to search out your favorite show or designer, as well as options to limit by area of design, content type,  genre, date, and more.

If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me – your library liaison to the Brind School of Theater Arts. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Jim Cowen
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

 

New Year, New Call Numbers!

Dear UArts Community Members,

As some of you may already know, we began a large-scale project in the Greenfield Library in the final months of the Fall 2017 semester. We reclassified every item in our collection from Dewey Decimal call numbers to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Okay, so you might be thinking, why? Well, there are a number of reasons.

  • The Library of Congress system is the standard system in the United States for academic libraries.
  •  It is already in use by the UArts Music Library and will help streamline the collections.

 It is widely regarded as a more effective system to use for classifying and finding academic materials.

You will encounter the LC system throughout your research at UArts and beyond. Even a cursory knowledge of its various sections will help you identify places in the library to browse and find materials. You can find out more about how LC call numbers are structured by taking a look at our UArts Libraries Call Number Guide on our website.In addition, we’ve created an LC subject heading guide, as well as corresponding bookmarks, available at the circulation desk:

The project included putting new labels on the books, removing every book from the shelves, and then moving the books into their new location.

From left to right: Barbara Danin, Acquisitions & Administrative Coordinator, Mary Louise Castaldi, Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian, and Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist, sorting books that were relocated to their new sections in the stacks.

Above: William Rooney, UArts Visual Resources & Special Collections Assistant, sorting books with new LC labels into their new respective aisles.

As you can see from the images taken over the holiday break, it was organized chaos with books all over the library (on tables, chairs, carts, and the floor), and staff moving in all directions!

Thanks to the participation of the entire library staff and two very capable student assistants, the project was mostly complete before the beginning of the spring semester despite the interruption of 2.5 snow days. As we continue to power through the final stages of this project, please remember that we are always here to help you navigate your way through the library. Please don’t ever hesitate to visit us or stop by the circulation desk and ask for assistance!


~The UArtsLibraries

New database of modern popular music!

From acid house to zydeco,
from Acapulco to Zanzibar,
Bloomsbury Popular Music
provides worldwide coverage of modern popular music.

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Bloomsbury Encyclopedia of Popular Music of the World,
is a great place to start your research on popular music, and a great place to investigate something fun for your own interests.

Looking for information on a particular album? See if one of the 120+ 33 1/3 book series has the album you are looking for!
Each volume provides in-depth analysis of an influential album or event. A great mix of music is covered, ranging from U2’s Achtung Baby, to the music from the Super Mario Brothers video game, to Miles Davis’ Bitches BrewThe new global 33 1/3 series focuses on popular music from around the world and is growing regularly.

Also growing is the expanding collection of scholarly books, with a minimum of 5 titles being added annually.
Some cool topics are covered in these books, ranging from
the history of the music video to San Francisco ‘s music scene in the 60s.

This site even has a fun timeline of popular music covering the 1960s to today!

Links to the Bloomsbury Popular Music  database are available on the Reference Sources and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage: library.uarts.edu. Find them at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section.

UArts Library Homepage
For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

Rock on, UArts!

 

Jim Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293

Staff Recommendation: David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations

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David Bowie: The Last Interview and Other Conversations consists of ten interviews collected over a timeline of four decades. Each of the selected conversations focus on a variety of topics outside of the realm of the musician’s technical process. The conversations also provide readers with the ability to explore the personal identity of the man behind the music. The collection begins with Bowie’s first interview at age sixteen on BBC Tonight in 1964, touching on everything from the performer’s childhood experiences on the calloused streets of South London, to his battles with substance abuse. The series concludes with his final interview in 2006, just a decade before his final album release and imminent death.

This book is a perfect quick summer read, recommended for any individual interested in David Bowie’s personal identity outside of his role as a musical performer. It is available in the Music Library new books display area at call # ML420.B754 B694 2016.

-Nichole Seedes, Circulation Assistant

New database: The online library of pop music journalism!

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Interested in reading up on LL Cool J or Ke$ha?

Want to listen to an audio interview with
Black Sabbath’s Tony Iommi or Ozzy Osbourne?

Curious to learn more about industrial music or Scandinavian pop?

How about an unpublished 2011 interview with the late
Chris Cornell?

Worry not: the recently added database Rock’s Backpages has that and so much more!

 

RockPick

With over 30,000 articles by music journalists collected over the last 50 years, Rock’s Backpages covers a spectrum of artists ranging from Aaliyah to ZZ Top. The site covers too many genres  of music to list here, but to give you an idea you can browse Rock’s Backpages  for genres including prog rock to rockabilly, jazz to space rock, Japanese pop to trip hop; yup, all these any more more genered are covered is this database.

 

Sure, this is a great site for finding articles for assignments, but it is also a wonderful place to browse and learn about new genres of music, classic to contemporary artists, and popular music from around the globe.

 

Links to Rock’s Backpages are available from the Articles and the All Databases, A-Z lists accessible from the library homepage,
library.uarts.edu, at the bottom of the page in the “Online Resources” section:

UArts Library Homepage

 

For off-campus access, just remember you’ll be asked to enter your UArts credentials.
If you have any questions or need assistance in using this new resource, please don’t hesitate to contact me. You can always e-mail me, call me, or stop by the Music Library and I’ll be more than happy to help you.

 

Rock on, UArts!

James Cowen
Music Reference Librarian
University Libraries
The University of the Arts
jcowen@uarts.edu
215-717-6293