New @ the UArts Libraries: LIBRARIZINE

LIBRARIZINE is a new zine created by + about the UArts Libraries. The first issue was introduced at the libraries’ open house in August, and features an interview with Lillian Kinney, the University Libraries Archivist. The library plans to put out a new issue 2-3 times a year, at the start of the fall, spring, and possibly summer semester. Our goal is to help promote the libraries and all of the interesting things going on here, as well as the libraries’ zine collection.

 

You can pick up a copy of LIBRARIZINE at the circulation desk of the Greenfield Library or the Visual Resources and Special Collections.

If you are interested in submitting items (or suggestions) to LIBRARIZINE, or in using the libraries’ zine collection, please contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources & Special Collections Librarian at lgrutzeck@uarts.edu.

Staff Recommendation: Tin House



I recently discovered the pleasure of reading professional literary magazines. In particular, the magazine Tin House which is carried by the Greenfield Library. At a glance, the magazine’s eye catching cover illustrations stand out on the periodical shelf. The journal even includes the artist’s interpretation of the illustration at the back of the book. But mostly it is filled to the brim with beautifully crafted short stories and poems in a format that is pleasant to hold and to read.

A literary magazine is the perfect option for my attention span and life obligations when I just want to get a little creative refresher in the middle of the day. Tin House’s selection recently featured a beautiful atmospheric short story by Ursula K. Le Guin called Pity and Shame that took me right out of my obligations and into a quiet interpersonal exploration between a mine examiner and his nurse. They offer this story as well as a selection of other work on their website at http://tinhouse.com/read-the-latest/

Tin House is also a great way of staying up to date with contemporary authors and to sample works before committing. It’s a little bit like a Spotify recommended playlist: it helps to identify artists you might enjoy delving into so you can look up their album (or in this case their poetry collection) and dig in even deeper.

I recommend just a glance at this literary magazine, you can always find the latest issue at the Greenfield Library. Maybe even at one of their previous issues like Candy because much like the sweets on the cover you may find yourself delectably hooked. 

~ Recommended by Jo Dutilloy, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

Staff Recommendation: The Toaster Project: or, A Heroic Attempt to Build a Simple Electric Appliance from Scratch

Have you ever looked at a simple machine or object and figured, given the right materials, you could make one? If you have, where do you think you would even get those materials? In The Toaster Project, Thomas Thwaites sets out to make, you guessed it, a toaster, completely from scratch. This small book is divided into sections based on the materials needed and how Thwaites sets out to acquire them, from pouring a gooey potato concoction into hand-carved molds to make a kind of plastic, to digging for iron ore. There are even correspondences with different experts who charitably (and with varying levels of enthusiasm) try to help Thwaites with his seemingly ridiculous goal.

I first picked up The Toaster Project in college to pass some time. It’s a pretty short read and, in my opinion, interesting enough that you can get through it in one sitting. It’s ended up really sticking with me, and when I saw it in our collection I knew I had to pick it up again. I think what I love about it is that the book and the project are at once self-contained and expansive. There’s something satisfying about getting from one end of the book to the other, seeing the initial conception of the idea and the journey all the way to the final strange-looking, mildly-functional toaster. Thwaites set out to make something and then made it, and that’s that. But the book also brings up broader questions about industry, the environment, the human experience, and more. Where do your things really come from? How long do they take to make and how long do they last? How separated are we from the production of the things around us? And what even is a toaster?

If you’re interested in those kinds of questions, or just in design, fabrication, sculpture, industry, environmentalism, or really any number of various related topics, I suggest giving this book a try. Aside from the project itself, the writing in the book is honest, funny, and just the right amount of self-deprecating. And if you’re interested in Thwaites’ work, you should also check out another of his well known projects, GoatMan: How I Took a Holiday from Being Human.

Find The Toaster Project at Greenfield Library, call # NK1447.6.T49 A35 2011

~Recommended by Kait Sanchez, Music Library Circulation Assistant 

Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

Staff Recommendation: Princess Mononoke

Released in 1999 and holding a 94% audience approval rating, this Miyazaki film was hailed as “The ‘Star Wars’ of animated features!” by the New York Post. Princess Mononoke brings together the world of the spiritual and the realities of man. Similar to Pan’s Labyrinth, and Miyazaki’s later movie Spirited Away, this film exists in a world where fantasy and reality push against each other as humans seek to destroy the old ways to make way for new.

At the center of the story is a young man named Ashitaka, who makes his way to a mining village after being cursed by a dying animal god.  There he meets Lady Eboshi, whose desire to acquire more iron for the village has put her in direct conflict with the nature gods that inhabit the land nearby who are lead by Princess Mononoke, a human girl raised by the wolf god. As his curse spreads, Ashitaka seeks to find a balance between these two opposing forces before both are destroyed by their own short sightedness.

This incredible film asks the questions; ‘Can Man and Nature coexist?’ ‘Is it possible to stand in the middle of conflict, or must we choose sides?’ ‘Who is really the villain?’ ‘Is there a place for those who are different?’With beautiful animation and subtle storytelling, Hayao Miyazaki asks us to come to our own conclusions through the actions of Ashitaka, Lady Eboshi and Princess Mononoke.

You can find this DVD at the Greenfield Library, stop by the circulation desk and ask for call # GD1475

~ Recommended by Lauralee Martin, Greenfield Library Work Study Assistant