Staff Recommendation: Jazz Italian Style, from its Origins in New Orleans to Fascist Italy and Sinatra

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Taking readers on a transatlantic musical journey, Jazz Italian Style explores how jazz permeated Italian culture, both through Italian immigration to the USA, and through the post-WWI introduction of jazz to the peninsula itself.  Jazz, an African-American innovation in music, evolved a distinctive Italian offshoot by the 1930s, due to the works of Italian-Americans on one side of the Atlantic as well as mostly northern Italians on the other side. Italian jazz musicians on both sides of the Atlantic would then in turn influence one another. The resulting distinctive style of jazz  became associated with Italian fascism and was even supported by Mussolini as an expression of national pride. Despite this dark co-optation, the style lives on today and is cherished by many around the world. This book will give you an appreciation for names of musicians such as Nick LaRocca and Gorni Kramer, and a unique picture of how this particular Italian style of jazz influenced the world of music.

This book is available at the UArts Music Library, call # ML3509.I85 C44 2017.

Mike Romano – Circulation Assistant, UArts Libraries

New Year, New Call Numbers!

Dear UArts Community Members,

As some of you may already know, we began a large-scale project in the Greenfield Library in the final months of the Fall 2017 semester. We reclassified every item in our collection from Dewey Decimal call numbers to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Okay, so you might be thinking, why? Well, there are a number of reasons.

  • The Library of Congress system is the standard system in the United States for academic libraries.
  •  It is already in use by the UArts Music Library and will help streamline the collections.

 It is widely regarded as a more effective system to use for classifying and finding academic materials.

You will encounter the LC system throughout your research at UArts and beyond. Even a cursory knowledge of its various sections will help you identify places in the library to browse and find materials. You can find out more about how LC call numbers are structured by taking a look at our UArts Libraries Call Number Guide on our website.In addition, we’ve created an LC subject heading guide, as well as corresponding bookmarks, available at the circulation desk:

The project included putting new labels on the books, removing every book from the shelves, and then moving the books into their new location.

From left to right: Barbara Danin, Acquisitions & Administrative Coordinator, Mary Louise Castaldi, Reference and Interlibrary Loan Librarian, and Lillian Kinney, Cataloger/Archivist, sorting books that were relocated to their new sections in the stacks.

Above: William Rooney, UArts Visual Resources & Special Collections Assistant, sorting books with new LC labels into their new respective aisles.

As you can see from the images taken over the holiday break, it was organized chaos with books all over the library (on tables, chairs, carts, and the floor), and staff moving in all directions!

Thanks to the participation of the entire library staff and two very capable student assistants, the project was mostly complete before the beginning of the spring semester despite the interruption of 2.5 snow days. As we continue to power through the final stages of this project, please remember that we are always here to help you navigate your way through the library. Please don’t ever hesitate to visit us or stop by the circulation desk and ask for assistance!


~The UArtsLibraries

UArts 140th #tbt Posts!

Have you checked out the University Libraries’ series of #tbt posts in honor of the University’s 140th anniversary?

You should!

Search Instagram for the hashtag #UArtsArchivesTBT, or visit:  https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/uartsarchivestbt

This is an ongoing series, so be sure to follow and check the UArts Libraries Instagram account regularly.

And boy, does this series have everything!

Students chilling on the steps of Hamilton Hall? Check.

Students sitting on the steps of Dorrance Hamilton Hall

Historic Philly shots? Check.

333 South Broad Street

Student makers making? Check.

Dance students practicing with labanotation score

Faculty engagingCheck.

Ben Eisenstat advises a student in an illustration class

Art installationsCheck.

Art installation at Hamilton Hall copy

A graduation photo from 1893!?!?! Check.

PMSIA class of 1893

Now, when you find yourself asking: where do they get all these wonderful photos?!?

Well the UArts Archives of course! All of the #tbt photos posted to Instagram -and many, many more- are available via the UArts Digital Collections page, accessible right through the good ol’ library homepage: library.uarts.edu.

The UArts Digital Collections contain not only photos from the UArts Archives, but also student work, campus event photos and videos, and other special digital collections!

Come celebrate 140home years of UArts history with us! 

Big band member and library student worker selected as a top soloist

The UArts Libraries wish to congratulate Henry Tirfe for being selected as one of five top solo artists in the College Big Band division at the 46th Next Generation Jazz Festival in Monterey, California.

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Not only is UArts School of Music student Henry Tirfe a great saxophonist, he is also a super-valued library student worker!

A junior in the UArts School of Music, Henry began working here in the Fall of 2015. He performed at the recent Next Generation Jazz Festival in California with the UArts “Z” Big Band, a finalist in the College Big Band Division.

“This was a first for me, a first for the ‘Z’ Big Band, and most importantly a first for the entire University,” said Tirfe. “I felt very proud flying back to Philadelphia bringing a trophy back for this school.”

And we are proud of him!

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Henry also pointed out the UArts Music Library has on hand some of the scores for tunes the ‘Z’ Big Band has played, such as Tiptoe and To You, composed and arranged by Thad Jones.

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Current UArts students, faculty, and staff can also listen to the tunes as originally recorded via Naxos Music Library Jazz and Music Online, respectively, available on the Audio and Video Online  library webpage.

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Our congratulations to director Matt Gallagher, the amazing students of the ‘Z’ Big Band, and again to outstanding soloist –and an outstanding work study student– Henry Tirfe!

UArts Libraries Work-Study Students are Honors Students

We are very pleased and proud to recognize Greenfield Library work-study students Sarah Gantt and Haylee Warner for their acceptance into the UArts Honors Program.

Our work-study students Sarah and Haylee are UArts Honors students.
Sarah Gantt (left) and Haylee Warner, UArts Libraries work-study employees and UArts Honors Program participants

Sarah is a sophomore painting major who worked in the library last year and was a great asset to our Fall 2012 Open House event, and Haylee is a freshman in the UArts School of Dance and is interested in how libraries and dance can interconnect. Sarah and Haylee happen to be excellent employees as well as excellent students. The honors program requires them to maintain a GPA of 3.75, do honors-enriched coursework, and provide community service. We think they’re up to the task.