New @ the UArts Libraries: LIBRARIZINE

LIBRARIZINE is a new zine created by + about the UArts Libraries. The first issue was introduced at the libraries’ open house in August, and features an interview with Lillian Kinney, the University Libraries Archivist. The library plans to put out a new issue 2-3 times a year, at the start of the fall, spring, and possibly summer semester. Our goal is to help promote the libraries and all of the interesting things going on here, as well as the libraries’ zine collection.

 

You can pick up a copy of LIBRARIZINE at the circulation desk of the Greenfield Library or the Visual Resources and Special Collections.

If you are interested in submitting items (or suggestions) to LIBRARIZINE, or in using the libraries’ zine collection, please contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources & Special Collections Librarian at lgrutzeck@uarts.edu.

Digital Resource of the Week: Artstor

The University Libraries provides students, faculty, and staff access to Artstor’s expansive digital image library consisting of over two million, high-resolution images from museum and archival collections around the globe.

Did you know that, in the past year, Artstor has implemented a variety of new tools that are totally worth checking out? Whether you’re looking for visual study tools to help you prepare for an upcoming art history exam or are wondering how to properly cite artwork in your bibliography  — the Artstor online database has you covered! Here are two new features available on Artstor that we thought were pretty awesome and wanted to share with the UArts community:

Artstor’s new Quiz Mode feature provides students with the ability to create an interactive flashcard feature that can be used to study for exams while in fullscreen mode. This flashcard feature is even available on mobile so you can study on the go! To activate Quiz Mode, first select an image and click on the Full Screen icon to launch full screen. In the lower right corner, click Quiz Mode Off.

Notice how the captions disappear and you can use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the group of images? Pretty cool right?! Visit this image group tutorial we created and try it out yourself!

Artstor also provides students with the option to create citations instantly in APA, MLA, and Chicago styles. All you have to do is navigate to your the image you’d like to cite, open it, then click the “Generate Citation” button. Next, a window will appear providing you with the artwork’s citation in three different formats available to copy and paste directly into the bibliography section of your paper:

To get the most of out your Artstor experience, it is imperative that you register and create an Artstor account. You can access the Artstor database by visiting library.uarts.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions, need assistance setting up your Artstor account, or are interested in learning more about Artstor, please contact Laura Grutzeck, our Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian by email or stop by the VRSC located on the mezzanine level of Anderson Hall!

Music Library Special Collections: Rare LPs

The music library has its own Special Collection of LPs78 rpm Long Playing recordsthat are incredibly old. They’re stored behind the circulation desk in the music library and are available to be played on turntables in the library’s listening area. Whether or not you are of the opinion that LPs sound better than CDs or digital music files, these records have a strong nostalgia value. If you’re the kind of person who enjoys the smell of old books, diving into a box of old records may be the right thing for you.

 

Beyond that, their historical value is undeniable. The records in the music library span from a “Collection of Rare Recordings by the Originator of Boogie Woogie” Pine Top Smith, to a 1938 recording of Irving Berlin to one of Paul Robeson’s very first records with recordings of “Were You There?” and “Steal Away” published in 1925.

 

So take a browse through the collection and instead of getting sucked into a series of google searches or looking on youtube for an old recording of a song by Charles Aznavour, come try it here.

 

Written by Jo Dutilloy, Music Library Circulation Assistant

From Special Collections to Visual Resources; Ad Reinhardt’s How to Look at Art

 

We recently had a request to add some images from Ad Reinhardt’s famous “How to Look” series to ARTstor. We were excited to discover that we had large reproductions of the entire series right here in Special Collections! We have added all 23 images to The Visual Resources Collection of the University of the Arts in ARTstor.

 

Ad Reinhardt’s series on looking at modern art first appeared in PM magazine in 1946. The series gives a humorous look at art history, politics, culture, and art criticism.

The entire series can be seen online in the Visual Resources collection in ARTstor, or in person in Visual Resources and Special Collections, right above the Greenfield Library on the mezzanine of Anderson Hall.

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions about using the Visual Resources and Special Collections, contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian.

New in ARTstor: 5000 images from Condé Nast

ARTstor has made available 5,000 images from Condé Nast in the Digital Library, including 2,000 cartoons from The New Yorker and nearly 3,000 fashion photographs from the Fairchild Photo Service.

This is the first release of a planned 25,000 images from Condé Nast, which will also include photographs from the Condé Nast Archive of Photography.

Christopher Weyant, The New Yorker Collection

To view these images, go to the ARTstor Digital Library. Click on the Find button in the menu at the top of the screen, and choose “Browse ARTstor by Collection”. Scroll down through the list of choices to get to Condé Nast. Double click on the name to open the entire collection, or click the plus sign in the folder next to the name to chose between Fashion, Costume and Jewelry and Drawings and Watercolors.

For more information on the Condé Nast Collection in ARTstor, visit Artstor’s blog.

For more information on using the ARTstor Digital Library, contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources and Special Collections Librarian.