New @ the UArts Libraries: LIBRARIZINE

LIBRARIZINE is a new zine created by + about the UArts Libraries. The first issue was introduced at the libraries’ open house in August, and features an interview with Lillian Kinney, the University Libraries Archivist. The library plans to put out a new issue 2-3 times a year, at the start of the fall, spring, and possibly summer semester. Our goal is to help promote the libraries and all of the interesting things going on here, as well as the libraries’ zine collection.

 

You can pick up a copy of LIBRARIZINE at the circulation desk of the Greenfield Library or the Visual Resources and Special Collections.

If you are interested in submitting items (or suggestions) to LIBRARIZINE, or in using the libraries’ zine collection, please contact Laura Grutzeck, the Visual Resources & Special Collections Librarian at lgrutzeck@uarts.edu.

Student Recommendation: Black Lives, Black Words

“I started Black Lives, Black Words because I felt there needed to be an opportunity for me as a playwright to speak out against the sins committed in this world inflicted upon black bodies: Michael Brown, Trayvon Martin, Rekia Boyd, Sandra Bland, Tamir Rice, and the countless many others.” ~ Reginald Edmund

Reginald Edmund started a project that asked black playwrights, visual artist, and poets from the US, UK, and Canada to create a ten minute play answering the question, “Do Black Lives Matter?” This anthology is product of the project.

Cover of Black Lives Black Words

Black Lives Black Words takes its opportunity to use art as activism and places its reader and audience members in situations where they may feel comfortable until there is no room for the word even exist. There is humor, songs, and a diverse community all ready to be explored within these pages. Each play gives life to voices who we haven’t heard from and to voices we will never hear again. There is an endless stream of names that get lost, forgotten, and/or dragged through the mud in the BLM movement. Reginald and his team of incredibly gifted artist have done their part in making sure we never forget that these names are more than just names. The lives and words of these selected black people are consciously shared in a way that has left a lasting impact on myself.

I highly recommend heading over to the Greenfield Library and checking out Black Lives, Black Words (call #:  PN6119.7 .B53 2017 ) This title is also available in eBook format through EbscoHost’s Academic eBook collection.

~ Recommended by Briana Gause, UArts Music Library Work Study Assistant

 

Staff Recommendation: Tin House



I recently discovered the pleasure of reading professional literary magazines. In particular, the magazine Tin House which is carried by the Greenfield Library. At a glance, the magazine’s eye catching cover illustrations stand out on the periodical shelf. The journal even includes the artist’s interpretation of the illustration at the back of the book. But mostly it is filled to the brim with beautifully crafted short stories and poems in a format that is pleasant to hold and to read.

A literary magazine is the perfect option for my attention span and life obligations when I just want to get a little creative refresher in the middle of the day. Tin House’s selection recently featured a beautiful atmospheric short story by Ursula K. Le Guin called Pity and Shame that took me right out of my obligations and into a quiet interpersonal exploration between a mine examiner and his nurse. They offer this story as well as a selection of other work on their website at http://tinhouse.com/read-the-latest/

Tin House is also a great way of staying up to date with contemporary authors and to sample works before committing. It’s a little bit like a Spotify recommended playlist: it helps to identify artists you might enjoy delving into so you can look up their album (or in this case their poetry collection) and dig in even deeper.

I recommend just a glance at this literary magazine, you can always find the latest issue at the Greenfield Library. Maybe even at one of their previous issues like Candy because much like the sweets on the cover you may find yourself delectably hooked. 

~ Recommended by Jo Dutilloy, Greenfield Library Circulation Assistant 

Staff Recommendation – The Artists Way

Do you ever feel creatively blocked, a feeling like all the color and life is lost from your artwork or craft? The Artists Way, by Julia Cameron, is a guidebook designed as a course in creative artistic recovery. Each section of the book describes practices, mindsets, and techniques for creative people, all of which build upon each other, to guide the reader into a more authentic artistic expression. The course is 12 weeks long. The aims include overcoming creative blocks and self-destructive beliefs, while building creative relationships, gaining confidence, and re-connecting to what she believes are the spiritual underpinnings of the creative drive.

In my opinion, this book is a valuable read, even if one does not pursue the entire 12 week course. The various practices described within it encourage one to be more mindful and creative on a consistent basis. For example, the practice of writing a full page of thoughts every morning, described in one chapter early on, can have the effect of bringing one face to face with what is going on the their life, paving the way for action. I recommend this book to anyone with an open mind who feels the need to re-connect to their creative self, whether you want to dive into a full-on course, or could use a few well placed pointers.

The Artists Way is available in the Greenfield Library open stacks at BF408 .C175 1992.

Mike Romano, Music Library Circulation Assistant 

Studio Art MFA Food For Thought Lecture Series: Cristiana de Marchi and Lonnie Graham

Artist and curator Cristiana de Marchi will speak Wednesday, July 11, at 7pm in Hamilton Hall, CBS Auditorium. Originally from Italy, de Marchi lives and works in Dubai and Beirut. She has published internationally about contemporary art as well as exhibited her own work in the UAE, Mexico, Spain, and Italy. Her profile and links to some articles she’s written are available through ArtTribune, an arts and culture website and magazine. You can watch one of her video artworks, Fish Market, a meditative performance in the Sharjah Fish Market.

still from de Marchi's Fish Market
still from de Marchi's Fish Market

Photographer and professor Lonnie Graham will speak Thursday, July 12, at 7pm in Terra Hall, Connelly Lecture Hall. Graham‘s work is sociological in nature, documenting the lives and culture of the people he interviews and photographs. Learn more about Graham by reading:

“Culture, Context Add to Appreciation of Photographs of a New Guinea Tribe” by Victoria Donohoe in The Philadelphia Inquirer, March 21, 1999: pg MC04. This is available full-text through UArts Libraries’ subscription to LexisNexis. You will need to log in with your UArts username and password if you are off-campus.

Context: Public Projects September 9 to 19, 1998 with project co-directors Anne Raman and Gerard Brown (Philadelphia: Foundation for Today’s Art/NEXUS, 1998). Available in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 725.9 F825.

Committed to the Image: Contemporary Black Photographers edited by Barbara Head Millstein (Brooklyn, N.Y.: Brooklyn Museum of Art in association with Merrell, 2001). Available in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 770.8996073 C767m.

New Land Marks: Public Art, Community, and the Meaning of Place edited by Penny Balkin Bach (Washington, DC : Editions Ariel, c2001). Available in Greenfield Library Open Stacks, call number 709.74811 N42.

photo by Lonnie Graham
photo by Lonnie Graham
photo by Lonnie Graham
photo by Lonnie Graham